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IT (Chapter Two) Post-Release Discussion
(09-15-2019, 09:09 AM)hp pufncraft Wrote: Y'know, as a normally eagle-eyed viewer when it came to matters of the female form, 11-year-old me somehow failed to notice this. I must have been distracted by Jamey Sheridan's magnificent hair. Time for a re-watch.

They made quite a few cracks about it throughout Just Shoot Me's run, too.  Usually from David Spade, naturally.
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I think I liked this more than most - the ending got to me - but it's a real example of for every good or interesting thing that they do, they also make a choice that is outright bizarre.

I'm not saying all movies should be political, but it felt very fucking strange to me that a movie set in the summer of 2016, about a monster that preys on people's fears and brings out the worst in them seemed to be completely devoid of almost all politics.

And I don't know what McAvoy's accent was.
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I don't agree that the movie needed more overt political statements (you're shocked, I'm sure!), but I do absolutely think the movie never gets at the heart of the problem with Derry and its citizens in a clear or effective the way like the book does.
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To be fair, it's not a problem they could have solved without making it overtly political, and that would have been distracting. I didn't want to see Adrian Mellon's attackers wearing MAGA hats or anything. And one of the things the book does well is make Derry feel of the 1980s, like it's taking place in a particular period. Here, it felt like it could have literally been any time in the last 10+ years. And I just felt the absence of that.
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I definitely agree that the adult time period is lacking some distinctiveness and specificity.
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(09-06-2019, 02:53 AM)Evi Wrote: Yup. There's something going on with him but it almost feels like the filmmakers throwing him a bone. He's the only Loser who doesn't have a real arc or sections of the film dedicated to him.

I remember when this was in production Musafa said something like Mike had become a heroin addict.

Given that the changes to Mike's storyline are...problematic to say the least, I'm glad they didn't go with this.

Good article about Mike - probably my favorite character in the book - here: https://slate.com/culture/2019/09/it-cha...anlon.html
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I thought it was super weird how they gave the town historian angle to fucking Ben in the first one for no really good reason. I don't wanna cry racism but it definitely felt like "Outta the way black kid, we need more for Ben to do to get him in with the Losers!"

But then in the sequel, Mike is just the history guy anyways. Maybe DON'T make the black character who's a historian in a town with an extremely dark and violent history of racist murder just some fucking 5th wheel kid for no really apparent reason?
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(09-09-2019, 08:44 AM)Evi Wrote: Girl in bleachers? Best scene of film. That and the opening were literally the only parts when it felt pure horror.

That bleachers scene fucked me up.

(09-09-2019, 03:18 PM)Overlord Wrote:
(09-09-2019, 03:14 PM)MichaelM Wrote: Cocaine's a helluva drug.

Do you prefer King's cocaine-binging or post cocaine-binging output, MichaelM?

**https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stephen_King_bibliography

****Needful Things, according to King, was his first "clean" novel

I'm using this as a catch-all for "when did King sober up" debate, but in ON WRITING, he talks about writing Misery and realizing that Annie Wilkes was basically his drug addiction - coke, booze, Robitussen, pills. I'd love to see some article where he confirms what his first "non coked up" book was, because if Tommyknockers was the last - which was right after Misery - then The Dark Half is also pretty good.
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I'm reading the Tommyknockers right now! I kind of feel like I've always been reading the Tommyknockers and always will be reading the Tommyknockers.
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THE TOMMYKNOCKERS is wild.

Not good at all, but I couldn't call it a boring read.
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It's getting wilder as we're heading into the climax, which I'm sure will be great!
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It’s certainly the climax that Tommyknockers has earned.

Four Past Midnight, the novella collection released between Dark Half and Needful Things, reads very much like he’s trying to remember how to write sober. Some of his worst work, if I recall. He kinda gets it together by the final story, which is practically a prelude to Needful Things.
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(09-15-2019, 10:25 PM)arjen rudd Wrote: It’s certainly the climax that Tommyknockers has earned.

Four Past Midnight, the novella collection released between Dark Half and Needful Things, reads very much like he’s trying to remember how to write sober. Some of his worst work, if I recall. He kinda gets it together by the final story, which is practically a prelude to Needful Things.

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Having read through this thread and mulled it over a bit more, I have to say I'm on team "I really liked this." Arjen and Reasor's comments earlier in the thread basically sum up how I feel, even if the flaws are there, and obvious. Ultimately, they had a big landing to stick and I think they stuck it.

(I do think that Hollywood has put Jessica Chastain in a kind of Galaxy Quest situation, where she's almost constantly spending parts of movies in white tank tops that get wet/damaged/beat up. Not that I'm complaining, mind. Just think it's funny.)

That being said, two things that I can't stop thinking about in terms of flaws:

--The "Here's Johnny" joke. Just like they have to counter one good thing with a bad thing (pun intended), the Carpenter reference - which works within context and for that character - is undercut by this one. But boy, that's some Family Guy level silliness, and to have it in the middle of Bev's big emotional climax when she's confronting her abusive past (without any indication, mind, that THE SHINING scares her) is something else. I actually have to kind of admire the audacity of it, in a way.

--McAvoy's accent. Now, I Boy, this has to be one of the strangest accents I've heard by a British actor doing an American one in quite some time. I looked at his CV, and he hasn't done many American accents, but I don't know what he was doing here. First, he's the only one of the adult cast that is trying to do a "voice," including Jay Ryan, who's Australian. I guess you could say that Hader is maybe doing a little more Marc Maron than his regular speaking voice, but it's still how Bill Hader usually sounds. Second, it seems like he decided to use a variation on his voice from SPLIT/GLASS, which does make sense because I believe he filmed GLASS and this one close together. But in no way is Philadelphia part of New England. So he's throwing a little bit of a New England accent in there. I think he just had to have gotten lost along the way, or just found it easier to do a similar accent to SPLIT rather than learn an all new American accent, especially since he had to incorporate the stutter. But it's a really weird voice, and it's made even more weird when McAvoy is in that scene opposite Stephen King, doing the most pronounced version of his Maine accent. It's very clear in that scene that one of those two dudes is from Maine, and the other one is from some place, but it's not from Maine.

This is my favorite passage from both IT and maybe from a King book, so I am really glad they incorporated some of this into the end. But I do wish they had ended with "All the rest is darkness."

Quote:“So drive away quick, drive away while the last of the light slips away, drive away from Derry, from memory...but not from desire. That stays, the bright cameo of all we were and all we believed as children, all that shone in our eyes even when we were lost and the wind blew in the night.

Drive away and try to keep smiling. Get a little rock and roll on the radio and go toward all the life there is with all the courage you can and all the belief you can muster. Be true, be brave, stand.

All the rest is darkness.”
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Bill's stutter makes him difficult as hell to play anyhow, I would imagine. I can't imagine trying to do an American accent while the need to act out the stutter is taking up a bunch of cognitive space
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Just finished 11/22/63.

The ending sucked.
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(Yesterday, 07:57 PM)freeman Wrote: Just finished 11/22/63.

The ending sucked.

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11.22.63's ending works for me, and then some. Its also my favorite King novel as well. The Hulu series was good too.

 I'm currently re-reading Salem's Lot for the first time since high school and I'm enjoying it as much now as I did then.
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Salem's Lot is terrific.
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(6 hours ago)Chaz Rock City Wrote: 11.22.63's ending works for me, and then some. Its also my favorite King novel as well. The Hulu series was good too.

 I'm currently re-reading Salem's Lot for the first time since high school and I'm enjoying it as much now as I did then.

I just felt like I had wasted my time on a pretty long book.
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