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Who is the director of the decade?
#36
Wes Anderson

Moonrise Kingdom (2012)
The Grand Budapest Hotel (2014)
Isle Of Dogs (2018)

Edgar Wright

Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World (2010)
The World's End (2013)
Baby Driver (2017)
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#37
You don't get to be on a best of the decade list if you made BABY DRIVER, one of the worst of the decade.
home taping is killing music
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#38
On the animation front, I'd go for Dean DeBlois for the How to Train Your Dragon trilogy. Three beautifully animated films with a coherent and compelling arc running through all of them.
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#39
I didn't see ISLE OF DOGS, but MOONRISE and BUDAPEST are two of my favorite Andersons.
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#40
(11-26-2019, 11:12 AM)boone daniels Wrote: I think it's abundantly clear that Gerwig had a major part in FRANCES HA and MISTRESS AMERICA, and whether she was the "credited" director on those movies is a question of semantics.


Being a little cheeky here, but I don't think a question for the DGA would be considered a question of "semantics".  She was a collaborator, not the director.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#41
No director has had more of an impact this decade than Zack Snyder.
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#42
What about James Cameron?!
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#43
Bazza gets it. So much humanity in Taika's films. So much love.

Speaking of love, I have a huge crush on both Sicario and Blade Runner 2, and thought Arrival was at least impressively staged, but I still haven't seen Prisoners or Enemy yet, so it's still a little early for me to decide whether New Zealand or Canada was the #1 film nation on the planet for the 2010s.
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#44
(11-26-2019, 03:44 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote: Being a little cheeky here, but I don't think a question for the DGA would be considered a question of "semantics".  She was a collaborator, not the director.

You say cheeky, I say patronizing. Gerwig is an essential part in front of and behind the camera of FRANCES and MISTRESS. To call her a "collaborator" feels diminishing of her accomplishments on those films.

And the DGA is a guild whose job is to protect the interests of its members by getting them the best possible outcome and advocating for them ferociously.

Finally, as we've noted, in a world where it's more difficult for women to get movies made than men, women have frequently had to take roles as "collaborators" in order to make their voices heard - yet their "contributions" were essential to making those movies work. Thinking of Alma Reville and Marcia Lucas, for example. Or Nora Ephron, early in her career. Or Carrie Fisher's long career as a script doctor.

Anyway, a film is made by many people and to give the director complete credit, especially in cases like those and other independent films, is asinine. Tear down the auteur theory!
home taping is killing music
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#45
(11-26-2019, 04:21 PM)Bucho Wrote: Bazza gets it. So much humanity in Taika's films. So much love.

Speaking of love, I have a huge crush on both Sicario and Blade Runner 2, and thought Arrival was at least impressively staged, but I still haven't seen Prisoners or Enemy yet, so it's still a little early for me to decide whether New Zealand or Canada was the #1 film nation on the planet for the 2010s.

I haven't seen ENEMY but I've seen PRISONERS. It's....OK? Very good performances but it's relentlessly bleak and overlong. It feels more....meandering than SICARIO, ARRIVAL, and BR2049.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#46
As great as Nolan's decade has been I think Villeneuve just gets the nod. Prisoners is great, but the 1-2-3 of Sicario, Arrival, and Blade Runner 2049 is amazing

Credit to the Russo brothers, their Marvel films have been terrific too. I guess in the age we live in you could argue the Russo's deserve the "award" more, money, attention, hype. But Villeneuve's movies affected me more.
There are weapons in my hands, my hands are weapons.
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#47
Villeneuve, Peele, Dramatic McKay, Garland, Refn, Chad motherfucking Stahelski.

There’s a lot of my favorites who’ve been going strong this decade - Nolan, Scorsese, PTA, QT, Wright, and so on - but I’d like to say that one guy who I think has finally earned his place at the table this decade is James Mangold. He’s been in the game for 25 years, but Logan and Ford v. Ferrari were a solid case that he’s a great.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#48
(11-26-2019, 04:38 PM)MichaelM Wrote:
(11-26-2019, 04:21 PM)Bucho Wrote: Bazza gets it. So much humanity in Taika's films. So much love.

Speaking of love, I have a huge crush on both Sicario and Blade Runner 2, and thought Arrival was at least impressively staged, but I still haven't seen Prisoners or Enemy yet, so it's still a little early for me to decide whether New Zealand or Canada was the #1 film nation on the planet for the 2010s.

I haven't seen ENEMY but I've seen PRISONERS. It's....OK? Very good performances but it's relentlessly bleak and overlong. It feels more....meandering than SICARIO, ARRIVAL, and BR2049.

Interesting. 

Seems like NZ > Canada is what you're getting at.
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#49
I'm in the PRISONERS camp with MichaelM . . . I found it tedious. That's a divisive one, though. I didn't like ENEMY very much either, although I should probably give it a shot, as I was in the exact wrong mood when I saw it. Frankly, I respected SICARIO and ARRIVAL more than I actually liked them. I really liked 2049 though, so...
I was in a horror-comedy called BLACK HOLLER. It's now on Prime Video. Check it out!
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#50
Man, I thought Sicario was brilliant but I've kept hearing from some of you guys over the years that Enemy and Prisoners were hit or miss so I even as someone who loves two of his films and admires a third I still haven't found myself drawn to watch those earlier efforts yet.

Meanwhile, seems like it's 2-0 for NZ > Canada.
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#51
I think it's difficult to have a "Director of the Decade" discussion, because it's impossible to identify standards which we all could apply.  So it basically becomes a "here's a body of work I admire" exercise.  So, sure, I think filmmakers like Spielberg, Nolan, Tarantino, and Scorsese have had fantastic runs this decade, and a couple of them even added some near-masterworks to their already-impressive filmographies.

If you're FORCING me to come up with another name, I might go with Damien Chazelle, who has delivered two masterpieces and one flawed (but still quite good) film over the last five years.  They all feel like focused, pretty singular visions. 

People like Robert Eggers (despite only making two films, one of which I've yet to see) and Jennifer Kent (despite me not liking THE NIGHTINGALE at all) also feel like filmmakers doing very personal things within "genre" space, and I always appreciate that.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#52
(11-26-2019, 04:32 PM)boone daniels Wrote:
(11-26-2019, 03:44 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote: Being a little cheeky here, but I don't think a question for the DGA would be considered a question of "semantics".  She was a collaborator, not the director.

You say cheeky, I say patronizing. Gerwig is an essential part in front of and behind the camera of FRANCES and MISTRESS. To call her a "collaborator" feels diminishing of her accomplishments on those films.  

And the DGA is a guild whose job is to protect the interests of its members by getting them the best possible outcome and advocating for them ferociously.

Finally, as we've noted, in a world where it's more difficult for women to get movies made than men, women have frequently had to take roles as "collaborators" in order to make their voices heard - yet their "contributions" were essential to making those movies work. Thinking of Alma Reville and Marcia Lucas, for example. Or Nora Ephron, early in her career. Or Carrie Fisher's long career as a script doctor.

Anyway, a film is made by many people and to give the director complete credit, especially in cases like those and other independent films, is asinine. Tear down the auteur theory!

Was she essential in the directing process of those Noah Baumbach films that very much feel like Noah Baumbach films? You could maybe say she was an essential part of the writing process, (which isn't the question of the thread) given those movies female focus, I guess that wouldn't be a bad guess to make...but then France Ha is basically a remake of Georgy Girl so I don't know.
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#53
Eli Roth

*drops mic

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#54
The problem with naming people like Chazelle, Gerwig, Eggers, Peele, etc... is that they've only started making movies in the past five years. You gotta be active since 2010 to be the director of the decade!
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#55
Hard to argue against Villeneuve.
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#56
I think the top contenders are Vllleneuve, Spielberg, Nolan, and Scorsese.

I'd say QT, too, but 1) I'd forgotten Inglourious Basterds doesn't count and 2) I don't think Django is very good.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#57
I think Villeneuve has yet to direct a truly GREAT film, but he does deliver a pretty consistent baseline of quality.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#58
For me, ARRIVAL and SICARIO both count as great.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#59
SICARIO comes close.  I think it's very good.

ARRIVAL left me incredibly cold.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#60
Obviously, you have no soul.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#61
Crowd cheering

Comes back on stage

Jeremy Saulnier

*drops mic again

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#62
Gerwig is the co-writer of both FRANCES HA and MISTRESS AMERICA, so you can definitely say she was part of the writing process, simbob. And yes, those are Noah Baumbach movies that are of a piece with his earlier work, but there's a lightness, a deftness, an openess to FRANCES and MISTRESS that's not there in SQUID or MARGO or even GREENBERG. What changed between those two? What sets those two apart from, say, even MEYERWITZ STORIES?

I'm just saying if we're going to be throwing names like Kevin Feige around as part of this discussion, then we should be open to considering other figures who made major contributions as well.
home taping is killing music
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#63
Scorcese found his latter-day muse in DiCaprio, but there's no co-directing credit. Almodovar is often never better than when he works with Penelope Cruz. Kinski and Herzog. Gena Rowlands and Cassavetes (married even!), Kurosawa and Mifune. All largely wonderful, brilliant collaborations.

But one director.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#64
I don't think Gerwig would say she directed those films if you asked her. Asked her in all confidence, off the record, just between you and me.
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#65
Even though DJANGO is one of my least favorite of his, QT still gets my vote.

In terms of pure impact, Ryan Coogler comes to mind. A trio of very excellent, very successful, and very different films.
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#66
I think Coogler is a great one, as far as influence this last decade.
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#67
For your consideration: Jaume Collet-Serra

In terms of influence, it's gotta be Refn with the gel lights, closely followed by Harmony Korine and Spring Breakers. Every indie films looks like that now.
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#68
(11-26-2019, 08:52 PM)MichaelM Wrote: Obviously, you have no soul.

Obviously. I feel only apathy towards the attempted emotional backbone of ARRIVAL.

The more clinical side of the movie works well for me, though.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#69
QT also gets penalized for putting out Hateful Eight, which has has a few very fun moments and Walton Goggins being magnificent, but also plenty of fairly pedestrian moments and too many performances which feel like actors hamming it up while playing fancy dress rather than feeling like the kinds of flesh and blood characters in which one might easily invest some suspension of disbelief.
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#70
Ironically the only Villeneuve that didn't leave me cold was the unneeded sequel to an 80's classic that leaves me cold. But as good as Blade Runner 2049 is, it's not going to elevate him to director of the decade status.

I can't think of anybody who made three great films, let alone four. I'm sure they're out there, I haven't seen them though, (Admittedly, I saw far less movies this decade than in the previous two.) Maybe Scorsese can get it, if I love The Irishman. On the strength of the strongest twofer, plus TV work, I'd nominate Fincher.

Another name worth considering that I didn't notice mentioned- Yorgos Lanthimos (Dogtooth was a 2010 movie for US audiences.)
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