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Who is the director of the decade?
#71
(11-26-2019, 09:24 PM)Neil Spurn Wrote: I think Coogler is a great one, as far as influence this last decade.

Agreed. I have yet to see Fruitvale Station, though.

Also: S-C-O-R-S-E-S-E  Wink

(I harp because I misspelled this for most of my life!)

(11-26-2019, 10:31 PM)Bucho Wrote: QT also gets penalized for putting out Hateful Eight, which has has a few very fun moments and Walton Goggins being magnificent, but also plenty of fairly pedestrian moments and too many performances which feel like actors hamming it up while playing fancy dress rather than feeling like the kinds of flesh and blood characters in which one might easily invest some suspension of disbelief.


For me, Hateful Eight has only gotten better with age. I agree there's an affected or exaggerated aspect to it, but (for me, at least) it works. I don't think the movie's trying to be a gritty, ultra-realistic historical story. It uses, inverts, and plays with archetypes and stereotypes very purposefully.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#72
Bong Joon-Ho

Snowpiercer (2013)
Okja (2017)
Parasite (2019)

David Fincher

The Social Network (2010)
The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo (2011)
Gone Girl (2014)
Mindhunter (2017, 2019)
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#73
I think Hateful Eight is my favorite QT of the decade.

If we’re saying Director of the Decade, I think I’d put forth Rian Johnson. I’m an agnostic on TLJ, but it’s probably the most talked about film of the decade, eliciting strong reactions from pretty much everyone (except me). His other films are all fairly notable, cross-genre successes, and I give him credit for Ozymandias too, arguably the best television episode of the decade.

This is a position based more on cultural position than objective quality. But no one would agree on that anyway. If we’re going with who made the most films I liked, I guess QT or Scorsese. But that’s dull.

The main thing I’m getting is there’s no obvious answer here.
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#74
Oh, Linklater made two masterpieces and one hell of an entertaining film, plus Bernie- I haven't seen his latest two, but he could be in the running.
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#75
If we're bringing in TV work, then I think you gotta put Cary Joji Fukunaga in the mix.

I also keep thinking about how Danny Boyle has had a fascinating decade.
home taping is killing music
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#76
George Miller has directed two movies since 2009: Happy Feet Two and Mad Max: Fury Road.

Decade defined.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#77
Crowd still cheering. Stomping feet in righteous ecstasy

Comes back out to shout out Harmony Korine

Sees a few dissidents chanting for the Russo brothers + Rian Johnson



[Image: BreakableDimpledGoa-size_restricted.gif]

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#78
Korine falls into that category, for me, of directors that would be in the conversation if they had 1-2 more films. I think Spring Breakers and Beach Bum are both pretty great, but I think 2 films is probably generally too few to qualify - unless one of those 2 films was an absolutely totemic film. Spring Breakers is not that far off that standard, but it doesn't quite get there for me.
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#79
Best of the decade:

Quentin Tarantino and Paul Thomas Anderson

With Wes Anderson right below.

I feel like Takashi Miike could be in there. He seems to have fallen out of awareness somewhat in comparison to the 2000s, (which sadly feels like a bit of a knock against being up) but he's still got some really good stuff in the 2010s, which he kicked off with 13 Assassins.

Jeremy Saulnier, Hélène Cattet & Bruno Forzani, Alex Ross Perry, Bong Joon-ho, Joshua Oppenheimer, Ben Wheatley, Lars von Trier, Gaspar Noé, Park Chan-wook, Edgar Wright, and Yorgos Lanthimos feel like names to consider. I'd put them right outside of Best Of The Decade, but the seem like names to consider anyways.

I wouldn't call Spielberg Best Of The Decade, but this decade has been a real comeback for him. After Tintin and most of his 2000s movies I was done with Spielberg. But after The BFG I've been going back through his 2010s stuff and been liking it. Although I still have seen The Post.

Scorsese, I still need to see Silence, and I haven't seen The Irishman yet. But I thought Shutter Island was pretty fucking terrible, (I guess your mileage depends on how quick you do or don't know everything happening) and I didn't like Hugo all that much either. Wolf of Wall Street was really good, there's some great stuff in it, but I'm not sure where I'd put that one film when it comes to best of the decade; but I don't think it'd be high. Maybe Silence and The Irishman would completely turn my view around, but of the films I have seen I'm surprised his name is even coming up for director of the 2010s.

I've liked all of Villeneuve movies (other than Incendies, which I haven't seen) this decade to some degree or another. I think Blade Runner 2049 is his only really great movie. 

Gerwig just seems like a weird name to even bring up. She's only directed one movie this decade any of us have even seen. And while I do like Lady Bird, Lady Bird isn't so fucking strong to even put her name in the running as director of the decade on the grounds of that one film. Peele seems a little odder after Us, (and his terrible Twilight Zone show, although he didn't direct any episodes) which outside of the soundtrack and like a couple shots was pretty bad. If I was throwing names in on the back of one movie I'd throw Julia Ducournau, Panos Cosmatos, and Coralie Fargeat in there.
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#80
After seeing THE IRISHMAN, I kind of think the answer to this question really might be Martin Scorsese, after all.

- SHUTTER ISLAND
- HUGO
- THE WOLF OF WALL STREET
- SILENCE
- THE IRISHMAN

Five excellent films, five very different films. A case could be made for any and all of them being among the decade's best.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#81
Is there a decade after '69 that you couldn't?
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#82
The '80s, '90s, 2000s, and probably this decade too.

Oh, I can't wait until next year when we can start referring to decades as just the last two numbers when writing and talking about them.
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#83
Damien Chazelle
Nicolas Winding Refn
Wes Anderson
Takashi Miike
David Fincher
David Lynch (Twin Peaks Season Three's eighteen episodes were the equivalent of nine movies!)
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#84
(11-26-2019, 03:52 PM)atomtastic Wrote: No director has had more of an impact this decade than Zack Snyder.

After we barely finished hammering out the dent left by Michael Bay too. Never parking there again unless they put in a camera. Sorry, what were we talking about?
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#85
Alex Garland would be my pick. Ex-Machina, Annihilation and also apparently secretly directing Dredd is one hell of a 1-2-3 sci-fi punch.

And I agree that Villeneuve is a talented director who has made multiple good films but no great ones. Yet. Arrival is his best, IMO.
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#86
Villeneuve and Tarantino come to mind ... although I have a sneaking suspicion that a couple of Tarantino's movies that I think were in the 2010s were actually in the late 00s. I am not sure there is a "director of the decade" for the 2010s.

There sure as fuck is a producer of the decade, though. Feige has had more of an influence on this last decade than any three directors, combined. I almost think of the '10s as representing the Rise of the Producer, as guys like Feige, Blum, Kennedy, maybe even Pascal, have come to dominate the decision-making as to what movies we are seeing.

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#87
As frowned on as he is by polite society, Woody Allen still made some of the best movies of the decade.

If anyone else had made them, BLUE JASMINE and WONDER WHEEL would be beloved and obsessed over.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#88
I like IRRATIONAL MAN quite a bit, even though it covers ground he covers better in other movies.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#89
I actually took dates to see Blue Jasmine and Midnight in Paris. Oh, what a different era that was.
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#90
I didn't see Wonder Wheel, and I thought Midnight in Paris was largely fluff, but Blue Jasmine is indeed an honest to god great film.
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#91
Midnight in Paris was my first movie date with my wife. I love that film, it's really nice.
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#92
(12-01-2019, 12:10 AM)Overlord Wrote: Villeneuve and Tarantino come to mind ... although I have a sneaking suspicion that a couple of Tarantino's movies that I think were in the 2010s were actually in the late 00s.  I am not sure there is a "director of the decade" for the 2010s.

There sure as fuck is a producer of the decade, though.  Feige has had more of an influence on this last decade than any three directors, combined.  I almost think of the '10s as representing the Rise of the Producer, as guys like Feige, Blum, Kennedy, maybe even Pascal, have come to dominate the decision-making as to what movies we are seeing.

Yeah.  The 2010's (thanks to Peak TV) seems more like the Producers are in the driver's seat as far as artistic vision is concerned.  Kevin Feige is a lock for that.
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#93
I'd agree that Feige gets Produce of the Decade. Easily.

Thus far in this discussion, though, Nolan gets my vote for Director of the Decade. QT and Villeneuve are close seconds.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#94
I feel like directors like Ryan Coogler and Jordan Peele would be in the running with one masterpiece or a couple more really amazing movies under their belts. Best new directors of the decade at any rate.
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#95
(12-02-2019, 01:23 PM)ChrisW Wrote: I feel like directors like Ryan Coogler and Jordan Peele would be in the running with one masterpiece or a couple more really amazing movies under their belts.   Best new directors of the decade at any rate.

While I don't necessarily care for his films, Chazelle is probably most folks' vote for that category.

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#96
Seconded. Chazelle gets a nod for me for WHIPLASH alone. I think all three of them (Chazelle, Coogler, and Peele) are going to have long and notable careers, though.
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#97
(12-02-2019, 04:55 PM)Judas Booth Wrote: Seconded.  Chazelle gets a nod for me for WHIPLASH alone.  I think all three of them (Chazelle, Coogler, and Peele) are going to have long and notable careers, though.

Of the three, I'd suspect Coogler, by far, of having the most ongoing mainstream success.

Chazelle seems like he has the hallmarks of a wunderkind who will crawl up his own ass eventually.  As for Peele, it seems like his sensibilities may be running more towards the producer side of the spectrum ... creating/spawning properties and projects rather than continuing to direct.  

**Disclaimer:  I happen to have liked Coogler's directing efforts a lot more than the other two choices.

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#98
I can actually see Chazelle having the most mainstream success of any of them. He's the better director by a fairly wide margin, and he's had the biggest success with an original film. It'd be nice to see him direct some genre stuff, he got his start writing on 10 Cloverfield Lane and The Last Exorcism Part 2.

Coogler feels like he's just going to be lost in franchise films. Nobody really seems to build a name off Marvel movies (outside of maybe Gunn and Favreau) because Marvel is the branded name on those.
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#99
I've liked each of Chazelle's films less and less. Love WHIPLASH, LA LA LAND left me cold and most of FIRST MAN left me even colder.
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Has anyone mentioned Pedro Almodóvar?

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Almodovar is one of my biggest blind spots. I've seen WOMEN ON THE VERGE OF A NERVOUS BREAKDOWN and that's it.
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I think you'd love THE SKIN I LIVE IN

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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I think so as well. On a surface level, it appears to be a riff on EYES WITHOUT A FACE, and I love that one.
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(12-02-2019, 08:37 PM)Mangy Wrote: I've liked each of Chazelle's films less and less. Love WHIPLASH, LA LA LAND left me cold and most of FIRST MAN left me even colder.

I wasn't the biggest fan of Whiplash and other than the last 10 minutes or so just flat out did not care for LA LA Land ... I keep meaning to check out First Man, but if THAT film left you colder than the first two in his oeuvre maybe I should keep skipping it.  

(12-02-2019, 08:42 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: Has anyone mentioned Pedro Almodóvar?

Yes, someone has.

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I know First Man has its proponents on here, but I found the lead characters to be maddening ciphers...yes, they were maddening ciphers in real life, but the end result kept me at arm's length, even as I recognized Chazelle's incredible talent. The moon landing is fantastic.
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