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TC Cinematic Treasure Hunt #8 (April 2021)
#71
I forgot one more: MIKE TYSON: UNDISPUTED TRUTH (2013) (Amazon) Spike Lee directs Tyson's one man Broadway show where he tells his life story with self-effacing humor and the street wisdom of an OG who survived the game. I've been re-watching a lot of Tyson's early fights in order of his rise, so I ordered this up as a bit of a lark after a long night. I'd seen the Toback doc, so I felt I knew the story. When this started out and Mike's kind of telling jokes, I thought this was going to be like Jake LaMotta at the end of RAGING BULL. However, the biggest surprise is the guy IS actually funny. He really goes all in, leaning into his monologue, and it's like watching a tightrope walker. I kept expecting him to stumble, but he never did. At one point he's telling some juvenile delinquent story from his youth, and he pauses and points to some white dude in the audience, with perfect delivery, he says "Sir, you look you've made a lot of mistakes in your life..."

I guess, whether one will enjoy this or not, comes down to if you can have empathy and compassion for someone like Tyson. I found his honest discussion of his entire life extremely poignant; and I was impressed with the intelligence and maturity he displayed in his reflections.

Verdict: A Eric Bogosian one man show by way of 'Def Comedy Jam'.

I've laughed super hard at the RAW opening skit since I first saw it at 13:






Sam Jackson makes it: "Haha, I love that doo doo line! The boy's got talent!"

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#72
For Perspective: The reason I revisited HIMSELF after DELIRIOUS, was this podcast dropping knowledge of the history of the Eddie/Cos relationship. Way more interesting than the usual talking points everyone spins:




"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#73
5. Watch a movie where a major character is facing imminent death for the majority of the runtime.
"Why Johnny Ringo. You look like someone just walked over your grave." TOMBSTONE

IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT (1967). Sidney Poitier is facing imminent death from good ole boys for most of the film
I'd never see this before and finally caught it thanks to the 31 days of Oscar on TCM. This is a stunning film. I was at complete attention the entire time due to the deliberate plotting and the fantastic acting from the leads. And holy shit are the leads good in this. I know that people say that Poitier should have won best actor for this but I gotta say, Rod Steiger turns in one of the single best acting jobs that I've ever seen here. Just...wow. Hell of a movie.

3.  SWORD STAINED WITH ROYAL BLOOD (1981)
5. IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT
9.  DEATH RACE: BEYOND ANARCHY
11.  KID WITH THE GOLDEN ARM and FLAG OF IRON
12.  BEN-HUR (1959)
13.  ACTION IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC
17.  THE CHINATOWN KID
24.  THE AWFUL TRUTH
30. LET IT RIDE
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#74
29. Watch WHERE'S POPPA?, watch a film that stars George Segal or Ruth Gordon, OR watch a film that's directed by Carl Reiner.

"She's not just another nurse, ma. It means a whole lot to me, ma. And I want you to know that if you mess this one up for me, I'm gonna punch your fuckin' heart out. Got it?" WHERE'S POPPA?

The Hot Rock is one of those titles that's floated in the background for me for decades, always recommended with fond recollection. Well, I finally got around to it and it is indeed a lot of fun. Segal is pretty subdued here, perhaps happy to let Robert Redford do the heavy lifting. He does have a fun introduction, fumbling with the modern automated features on his freshly-stolen car.

23. A new invention: Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?
29. George Segal: The Hot Rock
30. Luck, good or bad: WW84
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#75
Watch a film that has an ambiguous ending.

"I am not the Zodiac. And if I were, I sure wouldn't tell you" ZODIAC

BAMBOOZLED (2000) (Amazon) - Spike Lee's scathing race satire is like his GOODFELLAS to SCHOOL DAZE's MEAN STREETS. This caps off this late 90's run of pure rage mode cinema. Spike is throwing a lot of punches here, and not all of them land, but the ones that do hit pretty damn hard. This is the closest Spike ever came to a Melvin Van Peebles movie. The absurdity of the tone is somewhere between WATERMELON MAN and SORRY TO BOTHER YOU, even if the film itself isn't quite as good as either. Performance to Savor: Damon Wayans- a brilliant portrait of selling out; of artistic ambition leading to the loss of soul. His character is equal parts infuriating and tragic. Tip of the hat for just going for it. The fact a Wayans brother is playing the role is almost cold-blooded irony.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#76
A final note on BAMBOOZLED: There's a lot of DePalma-ish humor in the mix. I feel both the "Be Black, Baby" segment of HI, MOM and BONFIRES OF THE VANITIES were an influence.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#77
6 Watch a film that has an ambiguous ending.
"I am not the Zodiac. And if I were, I sure wouldn't tell you" ZODIAC

FIVE EASY PIECES (1970)
Another classic that I finally crossed off of my list thanks to TCM. Excellent movie although Jack Nicholson's character is incredibly unlikeable and downright mean to almost everyone that he encounters. You'd write him off completely if the film didn't provide necessary moments (epiphanies, perhaps) that helped to generate some sympathy for the man. The ending is something that I think will linger with me for a long time.

3.  SWORD STAINED WITH ROYAL BLOOD (1981)
5. IN THE HEAT OF THE NIGHT
6. FIVE EASY PIECES
9.  DEATH RACE: BEYOND ANARCHY
11.  KID WITH THE GOLDEN ARM and FLAG OF IRON
12.  BEN-HUR (1959)
13.  ACTION IN THE NORTH ATLANTIC
17.  THE CHINATOWN KID
24.  THE AWFUL TRUTH
30. LET IT RIDE
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#78
Notes from two days: Bogart, samurai judging a man for his desire to commit seppuku because they're military-like, a shit 80's nostalgia favorite, opera for the MTV set, and a massive, long blindspot.

2. "You know what? There is no Easter Bunny! It's just a guy in a suit!" - Flight of the Navigator (1986, dir. Randal Kleiser)
Quote:At least three or four movies are out there that do this better. The plot makes no fucking sense. Why him? Why some random July 4 to abduct him? What’s with the two-dimension timelines? I badly want to enjoy this, but I’m either too snobbish or not young enough to enjoy this. The first act goes on for what looked like half the runtime. Remarkable practical effects and an awesome Paul Reubens vocal performance as what’s basically a space version of Conky. However, Max arrives too late, and before that, you’ve got the kid to deal with, which is already bad on top of knowing, deep down, we all would think this was the peak of our lives if we were 12. 2/5

4. "There's an old Irish saying: don't listen to old Italian sayings." - Aria (1987, dir. various)
Quote:Like watching a chunk of 80’s MTV with the commercials deleted and it’s all opera and world cinema. I’m a man of culture, but I also find premeditated ambition a tricky concept. The whole time felt like you’d see this projected on a screen at a nightclub with the sound off. Bridget Fonda and some other guy go to Vegas and have sexy times at a hotel. John Hurt plays Pagliacci. The Godard segment was a highlight, a gaudy softcore workout fantasy with a ridiculous amount of nudity that felt right in the wheelhouse of the French making American culture look obnoxious because we brought it on ourselves. Julien Temple - the only director who was born out of music videos to be involved - has the most striking segment, which includes a moment of Buck Henry in a Tarzan singlet getting it on with Bev D’Angelo and yeah, it’s cinema all right. Not quite my tempo though. 2.5/5

13. "Don't be too sure I'm as crooked as I'm supposed to be." - To Have and Have Not (1945, dir. Howard Hawks)
Quote:Bacall Begins. Bogart Prime. Faulkner writing Hemingway. I don't know if I'm being controversial here, but Howard Hawks gets far more mileage out of Bogie as a morally ambiguous World War II smuggler than Michael Curtiz did. Why did I go this long without seeing this? I'm a fraud. Anyway, I might like this more than Casablanca if only because this leans far more noir, and serves as a great mirror image. 5/5

14. "We're here to preserve democracy, not to practice it." - Harakiri (1962, dir. Masaki Kobayashi)
Quote:Sumptuous, a masterwork of black and white ultra-violence and ethereal imagery that does so while keeping the samurai as a lawful-corrupt military body to assure that you won’t be entertained. Not that you could be entertained, as Kobayashi’s utilization of black and white will have you hypnotized no matter the complexity of the shot composition. Telling cautionary tales of suicide to redeem one man’s commitment to seppuku will only delay the inevitability of death. 5/5

30. "Hats. Okay? Hats. If I ever see a hat on a bed in this house, man, like you'll never see me again. I'm gone." - It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963, dir. Stanley Kramer)
Quote:No more unwieldly than Zack Snyder’s Justice League. But it’s also an hour shorter – this was my first viewing and the extended Criterion reconstruction at that – and might be the only comedy ever made that justifies being over three hours. If I was Stan Kramer, I wouldn’t have cut a frame of this so this version remained the “theatrical cut” and the only cut. Six stars for pretty much everything involving Jonathan Winters; his performance, especially the garage fight and when Phil Silvers abandons him, is remarkable, crypto-Farley/Belushi slapstick destruction, which this thrives on near-entirely. I love how broken Spencer Tracy's character is at the end, struggling to make sense of how this situation that might've netted him nearly a quarter million in 2021 money will ever provide enlightenment. Under the stars, that capitalist existentialism is the plot. 4.5/5

1. Cars - Gone in 60 Seconds (1974, dir. H.B. Halicki) 1.5.5
2. Holiday - Flight of the Navigator (1986, dir. Randal Kleiser) 2/5

3. Follow the Money - White Sands (1992, dir. Roger Donaldson) 3.5/5
4. Irish-Italian - Aria (1987, dir. various) 2.5/5
5. Heaven's Door - Never Die Alone (2004, dir. Ernest Dickerson) 3.5/5
6. Ambiguous - Cosmopolis (2012, dir. David Cronenberg) 4/5
7. Hero - Gor (1987, dir. Fritz Kiersch) 1/5
9. Fin - Godzilla vs. Kong (2021, dir. Adam Wingard) 4/5
10. Skinemax - Hot Dog... The Movie (1984, dir. Peter Markle) 1/5
11. ShawScope - Five Deadly Venoms (1978, dir. Chang Cheh) 3.5/5
12. Fire - Warlock III: The End of Innocence (1999, dir. Eric Freiser) 0/5
13. Bogie - To Have and Have Not (1945, dir. Howard Hawks) 5/5
14. Military - Harakiri (1962, dir. Masaki Kobayashi) 5/5
15. Eastwood - Ratboy (1986, dir. Sondra Locke) 3/5
16. Patriotism - Wolf Warrior 2 (2017, dir. Wu Jing) 3.5/5
18. Laundering - The Tailor of Panama (2001, dir. John Boorman) 4/5
19. Dead Lawyers - Traffic (2000, dir. Steven Soderbergh) 4/5 REWATCH
20. Amusement - Rollercoaster (1977, dir. James Goldstone) 2/5
21. Cyberpunk - The Thirteenth Floor (1999, dir. Josef Rusnak) 1.5/5
23. Invention - The Hudsucker Proxy (1994, dir. Joel & Ethan Coen) 5/5 REWATCH
25. Bud & Lou - Abbot and Costello Meet Frankenstein (1948, dir. Charles Barton) 4/5
26. Bosco - A Bucket of Blood (1959, dir. Roger Corman) 3/5
28. Never - Cradle 2 the Grave (2003, dir. Andrzej Bartkowiak) 2.5/5 REWATCH
29. Where's Poppa? - Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid (1982, dir. Carl Reiner) 4.5/5
30. Luck - It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World (1963, dir. Stanley Kramer) 4.5/5

RANKING:

The Hudsucker Proxy
Harakiri
To Have and Have Not
It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World
Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid
Abbott and Costello Meet Frankenstein
Traffic
Cosmopolis
The Tailor of Panama
Godzilla vs. Kong
Five Deadly Venoms
Wolf Warrior 2
White Sands
Never Die Alone
A Bucket of Blood
Ratboy
Aria
Cradle 2 the Grave
Flight of the Navigator
Rollercoaster
The Thirteenth Floor
Gone in 60 Seconds
Gor
Hot Dog... The Movie
Warlock III: The End of Innocence
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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