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Blade Runner Apreciation Thread
#1
"I've seen things you people wouldn't believe. Attack ships on fire off the shoulder of Orion. I watched C-beams glitter in the dark near Tannhäuser Gate. All those moments will be lost in time like tears in rain. Time to die."

Dunno what a C-Beam is and I wouldn't know Tannhauser Gate if I fell over it but my god, thats quite simply one of the coolest most beautiful pieces of dialogue ever IMO.


Any other fanatics of what I would call one of the most seminally influential pieces of science fiction anything created in the last twenty years?

The film that started an entire sub-genre of sci-fi.

And one of my absolute favourites...

Probably the closest I can come to having a favourite film (not that I could ever really class one film as my fave)




Thought Id start a thread to see how many other devotees of Scotts cyber-punk masterpiece are out there.
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#2
I read a bit from the screenwriter (Hampton Fancher, I guess it was; had to look that up on IMDB) in a book on sci-fi films that was in the film critique/theory of the bookstore I used to work at. I'm sorry but I don't remember the name of the book, but in it the guy talks about that passage of Batty's dialogue. It's all just evocative imagery, meant to capture the emotion of the moment. There was never any background developed as to what C-beams were, or the Tanhauser gate, etc. It's all just supposed to sound cool. But as a simple bit of texturing it was extremely effective. A wonderful moment for Rutger Hauer and Harrison Ford. Totally classic.
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#3
If my handle isn't obvious enough, I am pretty much obsessed with this film. Instead of retyping a bunch of stuff, I'll steal from my post in the 'Top 10 Favorite Movies Of All Time' thread in the 'Drafts & Lists' forum:

1. Blade Runner - I would ramble far too long about the things that make this movie the masterpiece that it is. I'm positive that this film helped to shape me into the person I am today. I don't know how many hundred times I've seen it, & it never gets old. If I see that it's on TV, I MUST watch it. I know every inconsistency, every mistake, every error in storyline & editing, & it simply. Doesn't. Matter. It truly is greater than the sum of its parts. The musical score is mesmerizing, & even with today’s advancements in SFX, its style has yet to be matched. Rutger Hauer's finest hour.

I own multiple copies of it, including a pristine edition of the unrated VHS. (Maybe, I'm really an assassin, who has been programmed with a compulsion to buy Blade Runner DVDs, so "The Company" can keep track of me. /Conspiracy Theory)




Or not.

P.S. The poster that RD posted, is one of my favorite versions. I'm also partial to the version that was painted in 2000, that is basically just a retooling of the original movie poster:
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#4
Quote:

Originally Posted by Chris Hill

I read a bit from the screenwriter (Hampton Fancher, I guess it was; had to look that up on IMDB) in a book on sci-fi films that was in the film critique/theory of the bookstore I used to work at. I'm sorry but I don't remember the name of the book, but in it the guy talks about that passage of Batty's dialogue. It's all just evocative imagery, meant to capture the emotion of the moment. There was never any background developed as to what C-beams were, or the Tanhauser gate, etc. It's all just supposed to sound cool. But as a simple bit of texturing it was extremely effective. A wonderful moment for Rutger Hauer and Harrison Ford. Totally classic.

Future Noir: The Making Of Blade Runner, maybe?
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#5
Yeah that 2000 posters not bad - but the one I posted is hands-down my fave as well

To my knowledge Mr.David Peoples was another writer of the screenplay. I get the feeling Fancher did the first draft while Peoples did the second.

I really need to re-read future noir actually.

Have you read that Roy? It's the absolute definitive book studying almost every aspect of the film.



RD
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#6
favorite of all time.
never get tired of watching this.
first true religious experience in a theatre
i cant think of anything clever to say, its all been said.

and incidentally, http://www.brmovie.com/ is the definitive website for all things blade runner..

it even has some additional chapters for Future Noir that Sammon ended up cutting out .

oh and speaking of Fancher, ive been looking for Minus Man recently.. anyone seen that?
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#7
Wow FF - thanks for that link mate.

That site is the shiznit!

RD
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#8
One of my favorites as well. Just a stunning piece of work from Ridley Scott and company. I've been waiting for the Special Edition dvd for years and it looks like that isn't gonna change anytime soon. Although Indy and Star Wars have been the 1 and 2 most wanted films its been the Blade Runner Special Edition I have wanted most on dvd. I love Indy and SW's as well though.
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#9
Quote:

Originally Posted by Johnny Daywalker

One of my favorites as well. Just a stunning piece of work from Ridley Scott and company. I've been waiting for the Special Edition dvd for years and it looks like that isn't gonna change anytime soon. Although Indy and Star Wars have been the 1 and 2 most wanted films its been the Blade Runner Special Edition I have wanted most on dvd. I love Indy and SW's as well though.

Im exactly the same Johnny.

One of the first dvd's I simply had to buy was BR but, thinking that an uber-special edition would be released for its 20 year anniversary, I held off. Im still holding off to this day.

Im about 5 minutes away from saying fuckit and double dipping - something I absolutely abhor doing, but hey - I haven't seen it in a couple of years now, Ive never seen the dvd transfer and Im sick to death of fucking waiting.

RD
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#10
You might as well grab the snapper case I eventually broke down and got it last year. Transfer is fine.
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#11
Quote:

Originally Posted by ferriferous foodi

oh and speaking of Fancher, ive been looking for Minus Man recently.. anyone seen that?

Yeah, it's alright. I had to see it because I loved the book, and I'm a big Owen Wilson fan. But the film doesn't do the book any favors--in fact, it utterly fails to convey what turned the main character into a killer, which was what made the book so good. The most interesting thing about Wilson's performance is merely the fact that he's doing straight drama here.

There are so many things that I love about Blade Runner, I have trouble even picking where to start, so here are a couple.
I love the choices they made for the sets and costumes. Deckard's square whiskey glasses, the pseudo-Egyptian decoration in his apartment, the wonderfully strange outfit Zhora puts on before she flees, the chess sets, everything seems perfect.
I love it that it's cyberpunk noir, like Neuromancer. To me, that's gotta be the coolest genre ever. The vision of the future in this film is so beautiful and nasty and believable to me. It seems like most futuristic sci-fi films are so hung up on their concepts that they forget all but the most mythical elements of humanity, like will, loyalty, etc. so that they can create exagerrated evil or heroic characters. Blade Runner seems so much deeper and more human to me. Everything is much more complicated. It's full of moral uncertainty and distrust. But it's still part of a complete world.

I might add that this is the first movie I have a really indelible memory of watching. I was probably in kindergarten, and I remember sitting at the kitchen table watching this with the family, and we were eating spaghetti. The part where Batty put out his maker's eyes really put me off my dinner.
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#12
Blade Runner's one of the finest things ever.
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#13
Alright...
Today is a day for confessions, so here's my cry of geek shame:

I've never seen Blade Runner.

So.....because you all seem to have an honest appreciation for the film, I wanted to ask your advice.
I understand that there are two versions, the "directors cut" and the "original". If that's true, which should I watch?
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#14
You just opened a can of worms, Jesse. The argument for both the director's cut and the original theatrical release is long and ongoing.

Fortunately for you, you don't have to make a choice. The original theatrical cut is only available on VHS and bootleg anymore.
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#15
Quote:

Originally Posted by Populationrob

You just opened a can of worms, Jesse. The argument for both the director's cut and the original theatrical release is long and ongoing.

Fortunately for you, you don't have to make a choice. The original theatrical cut is only available on VHS and bootleg anymore.

Man, and people give George Lucas a hard time...

Dammit. I want to make up my own mind....Thanks for the heads up, Rob
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#16
Quote:

I know every inconsistency, every mistake, every error in storyline & editing, & it simply. Doesn't. Matter.

I've seen this film several times as well and I adore it. But one of the reasons is that I find no flaws in it. What is this guy talking about? Can someone enlighten please?
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#17
Quote:

Originally Posted by The Rain Dog

...Have you read that Roy? It's the absolute definitive book studying almost every aspect of the film.



RD

It's sitting within arms reach, even as I type. I bought it several years ago. "Definitive" is absolutely the best description for it.
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#18
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jubei

I've seen this film several times as well and I adore it. But one of the reasons is that I find no flaws in it. What is this guy talking about? Can someone enlighten please?

HERE are some of the things I was talking about...
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#19
Favorite film, hands down.

"That's the spirit!"
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#20
Quote:

Originally Posted by BATTY [Roy]


Of course. You really are all about Blade Runner.

I was only 8 when it came out, and to me, Harrison Ford was Han Solo and Indiana Jones. My dad and I were both huge fans of Star Wars and Raiders, so he took me to see Blade Runner. I was not ready for that shit. I was impressed, overwhelmed in fact, but horrified at the same time. It just scared the bejeezus out of me.

When I watch it now I still find it creepy, but depressing rather than scary. Depressing in a good way. It's not an uplifting film for me. I find it to be a very dark work of art.
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#21
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jubei

I've seen this film several times as well and I adore it. But one of the reasons is that I find no flaws in it. What is this guy talking about? Can someone enlighten please?

IMO - The Directors Cut seven days a week and twice on Sundays.

The beauty of the images and the story speak for themselves.

Voice over for retards not required.

IMO.

RD
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#22
Quote:

Originally Posted by Jesse Custer: Carnivale Roustabout

Alright...
Today is a day for confessions, so here's my cry of geek shame:

I've never seen Blade Runner.

So.....because you all seem to have an honest appreciation for the film, I wanted to ask your advice.
I understand that there are two versions, the "directors cut" and the "original". If that's true, which should I watch?

They're really not that different. The Director's Cut lacks a voiceover so you can enjoy Vangelis' soundtrack even more, and the ending isn't a cheap copout like the original's is. All the continuity and ADR flaws and the like are still there.
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#23
Whilst the DC does have a better ending (the original's, using outtakes from THE SHINING, wraps it up a bit too much), I love both versions. I love the voiceover of the theatrical, and it just adds to the noir feel, especially the way Harrison did it, in a world-weary way (apparently he did it that way because he was pissed at having to do one and hoped it was so bad the producers wouldn't use it).

Either way though, it's a magnificent film.
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#24
Ouch. We've had some great and really thorough discussions regarding BLADE RUNNER here on CHUD before, but I just did a search and couldn't find any of the threads. Maybe someone with better search-fu can help me out.

First, a couple quick things.

1. I'm 99% sure that Rutger Hauer wrote the 'tears in rain' dialogue, at the last minute before going up to actually film the scenes. He brought them to Ridley, who at that point was so fried that he okayed it without even thinking about it. Lucky for them, lucky for us.

2. BRMovie.com is a really great fansite (make sure not to miss the one deleted scene of Holden in the 'iron lung' they have for download there), but hit http://www.bladezone.com too. Inspirational to anyone who isn't frightened of or down on that kind of fan intensity.

3. It's been covered multiple times on CHUD by The Hellboy in threads that have apparently disappeared, but the SE is never going to happen. One of the billionaire members of the Blade Runner Partnership, who I'm too lazy to Google (Jerry Perenchio, or something?), apparently still hates Ridley Scott and will not give the go-ahead despite a wealth of great footage and other stuff they have sitting in a vault just waiting to be put onto disks. A three disk BR SE that will never happen... it STILL makes me want to cry.

4. There is still some pretty great merchandise out there for fans. I got the Westwood game pretty easily and cheaply from can't-remember-where, and everyone says it's great. Been too busy to get around to playing it for myself though. I also have the two follow up novels, have read the first one, and think it's pretty enjoyable for anyone who wants to see more stuff with the BR characters. It's not fine literature by any means, and I've VERY iffy about the storyline of the second book, but still... I also just picked up, after all these years, the soundtrack album. Kee-rist is it ever fucking awesome.

I've always been fascinated by this movie, for so many reasons. To me it's less of a 'movie', and more like music... something I can spin repeatedly, and enjoy it on a totally different level than just a piece of storytelling. The acting is so good, the futurism so thought provoking, and the imagery totally compelling.
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#25
This is the kind of movie that you can put in your player and run in an endless loop.

Rutger is king in this film. Got me salivating for the new Batman movie coming out.
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#26
It's a shame the cyberpunk genre of movies really hit it's peak with Blade Runner (Matrix is arguable, but a close second imo). This movie just had the atmosphere and dialogue down perfectly.
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#27
Quote:

Originally Posted by BruceL

4. There is still some pretty great merchandise out there for fans.

speaking of merchandise...

check this sucker out.. sold for 350$ on ebay a month or two ago. manufactured by the sae people that made the original prop. word is he doesnt make anymore. Die cast metal.. 5 LEDs..

if i could get my hands on this, i think id actually consider my life complete
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#28
You all have convinced me to watch this again. I haven't seen it in a while. I own the dvd, but mine seems really dark in most of the scenes. (Dark enough to make it hard to see what's going on.) Any of you have that problem? It doesn't happen with any of my other movies.
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#29
Classic movie. If made today, it would be completely different. One of my favorites. This, along with 12 Monkeys, really represent the some of the best in thought provoking sci-fi.

In regards to the question posed earlier between director's cut vs theatrical cut, I have some anecdotal advice... Some of my friends, who had never seen the movie before, went to see the director's cut in the theater during a limited run a few years back. These are generally smart, perceptive filmgoers. Anyways, they liked what they saw, but had a hard time connecting all of the dots because not much was explained (something the voiceover in the original really makes explicit.) Then again, maybe they were really stoned.

I saw the original cut first, so I already knew what was going on when I saw the director's cut. The director's cut is a superior version of the film, but it might make the film a tad impenetrable to the first timer. I don't know what the consensus is.

I also heard of yet another version of this film to be re-released on DVD, but I haven't heard anything in a while. Want to buy this, but I hate double dipping.
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#30
Hand your friends a copy of Lost Highway and tell them they have nothing to bitch about.
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#31
I think it's best to see the Director's Cut first, and then the Theatrical version. I have introduced a lot of people to BR over the years and I always think it's interesting to see how much they pick up on in the director's cut. I really think that even though the two movies are quite similar, that they are two completely different movies because of the inclusion of the dream sequence. I haven't seen the theatrical cut in a long, long time but I have it on VHS. The director's cut makes all the origami make sense, whereas I just remember it being a quirky thing in the original version.

Funny Blade Runner story: a band I was in was putting out a record and we had a sample from Blade Runner in one song. We were told 'You'll never get permission to use that sample, they never clear any samples' and sure enough, the people who said that were right. However, I didn't realize just how complicated it was. Apparently in the process to request clearance, the request got all the way to Sean Young, and she left a message for us saying she didn't care, blah blah blah. It wasn't even from a scene she was in! Pretty wild to think about how the stars have to align over copyright issues, so I can see how another edition of the film might be impossible.
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#32
Quote:

Originally Posted by BruceL

...1. I'm 99% sure that Rutger Hauer wrote the 'tears in rain' dialogue, at the last minute before going up to actually film the scenes. He brought them to Ridley, who at that point was so fried that he okayed it without even thinking about it. Lucky for them, lucky for us...

In the afore-mentioned book, Hauer states that the speech (which was originally much longer) was written by David Peoples. Some of it was omitted, & Hauer improvised the last sentence ("All those moments..." etc.).

The most moving part of the film IMO.
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#33
*stands up*

"Ahem... My name is Roy. I am watching Blade Runner on Telemundo right now - - - and I don't speak Spanish. I am a Blade-Runner-holic."

*sits down*
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#34

Decided to watch it again after a night of slow-burn noir knockoffs.  It is absolutely still a stunner for me.  Visually impeccable, world-building beyond compare, and I just finished the Zhora 'retirement' scene in the Final Cut.  Perfect.  Perfect blend of visuals, music, and sense of remorse of duty. I still have friends to show this that haven't ever seen it, wonder what their fresh reactions will be. I 'appreciate' this movie to no end.  That is all.

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#35

It's my favorite film, and the Final Cut is amazing, but the "i want more life... father" doesn't work for me at all. I understand that it actually works great thematically, but "fucker" had SO much more impact, especially in a film that has no cussing otherwise.

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