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M. Night Shyamalan
#36
I don't dislike him, and I don't dislike his movies because of his success. I just think he's a mediocre director who needs to hire a cameraman who doesn't have parkinson's disease.

I think Clarke made a good point about something I don't really like about his movies that's always played up. The way they're character dramas dressed as genre pictures, but at the end of the day, they're still genre pictures. ALIENS is essentially a character study and a study of catharsism but it wears its genre conventions and connections on its sleeve, whereas Night's movies are always touted as 'thrillers' compared to horror, which SIXTH SENSE was, or sci-fi, which SIGNS was. Of course, that's sometimes the general Hollywood convention to do that too, so it might not be all his fault.
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#37
Quote:

Originally Posted by Fett

I just think he's a mediocre director who needs to hire a cameraman who doesn't have parkinson's disease.

Parkinsons?

Quote:

I think Clarke made a good point about something I don't really like about his movies that's always played up. The way they're character dramas dressed as genre pictures, but at the end of the day, they're still genre pictures.

You'd rather they be more conventional and straightforward? I think it's great he's turning genre stuff on its head. It's ONE FILMMAKER playing with it, don't you have countless other genre films to love? What's the harm in one guy doing something different?

Quote:

ALIENS is essentially a character study and a study of catharsism but it wears its genre conventions and connections on its sleeve, whereas Night's movies are always touted as 'thrillers' compared to horror, which SIXTH SENSE was, or sci-fi, which SIGNS was. Of course, that's sometimes the general Hollywood convention to do that too, so it might not be all his fault.

It's not his fault. He has to sell these expensive movies somehow. At least he's creative about it with the lack of floating heads on the Signs posters and not centering on "MEL GIBSON!" in the ads.
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#38
Sigh. I don't think he's doing anything new with the genres he's going with particularly. But that's not what I meant. What I mean is what I went on to talk about, i.e. the whole issue that a film becomes more legitimate when it's a "thriller" than a "horror." That's what kind of bugs me. I'm not especially talking about marketing. I'm talking about the way these films seem to be brought across as a whole, but then again, it's probably not specifically his fault.
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#39
I can't say my annoyance has ever been drawn to the camerwork in any of his movies. What problems do you have with it, Charles?
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#40
It was mostly in UNBREAKABLE really. I was really distracted through that whole flick because the camerawork just seemed awful. Maybe it was the guy's intention, but I found it horrific to watch.
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#41
I can understand people's negative reactuions to him; He loves to be the face of his movies, which inevitably attracts criticism directly to him, he is first in line for accolades as well as trashing. This is both egotistical as well as refreshing in that he takes his work as more than just a film, but as a reflection of himself. Speilberg and others maybe learned to back of and let films be judged as entertainment, while Shyamalan needs to grow into this approach. I'm sure he needs a lot of growth, becoming so sucessful so quickly doesn't always mean you are ready to handle the spotlight.

As far as his movies go; I really enjoyed the Village more than his others, but I was expecting a "horror" but instead really found a drama with dark undertones, a James Newton Howard score that is beautifully written and matches the emotion of the movie, and an overall look at people's fears and emotions that a standard horror flick would not develop. Some of it's corny, some of the story leaves questions unanswered, holes in the legitamacy, but I don't think his aim was to patch together a totally believable story as much as it was to show the human interactions. Unbreakable was the same, he wasn't trying to make a spiderman or hellboy movie with action and super powers galore, but a look at humans and their emotions/abilities to do good and evil.

Maybe I'm too liberal with the praise, but I for one enjoy all his character development, emotions, cinematography and story telling ability even though I look at the aliens or other tools he uses to facilitate the story as less than believable or imaginative. I love horror above all other movies, and Shyamalan's stuff is not horror to me, but still very good stuff,, though the studios and marketing people take that angle to try and pump up his movies at the box office.
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#42
I love the camerawork in all his movies, especially Unbreakable (so many great shots, the opening with no cuts until 5 minutes later, the one of Bruce being told he survived a train crash in the background, with a dying person in the foreground, blood seeping out of a wound, etc, etc).

I think what is irking alot of people (or just me) is the formula or template of his films, there is the now officially boring 'twist' at the end, and the horror-lite thriller genre traits among other things. I really think he should branch out and try different genres, or at least keep trying to best himself with each effort. I've been less impressed with his films from Sign onwards, I hope the trend doesnt continue with this mermaid story or whatever it is, but we'll see...
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#43
The guy is a complete one hit wonder in my book. Unbreakable was a great little thriller. Frankly there was not one thing in the movie that I did not like, from the story to the performances and camera work etc. The rest of his filmography ranges from interesting but dull films(Signs, the The Sixth Sense) to almost unwatchable tripel(The Village). I don't hate the man but I really think he may be the most overrated mainstream director ever.
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#44
Quote:

Originally Posted by chappers

The guy is a complete one hit wonder in my book.

One hit wonder? I don't think so. He's obviously very talented but is using the same bag of tricks. He just needs to pound those scripts into the pavement before starting production. That's his biggest problem. He spent 17 drafts trying to find Sixth Sense and it shows. He took a long time crafting the script for Signs and it also shows.

Like Lucas, he doesn't spend enough time on the fucking writing, which is where the real filmmaking is. If you don't have a rock solid foundation, how can you expect to construct a stable building?
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#45
I very much liked "Sixth Sense" and "Signs", thought "Unbreakable" was mediocre, and that the "Village" was ruined by a unbelievable main plot premise. I simply could not buy it, and that ruined the movie IMHO.
I think the Shylmalan has to be wary of "surprise endings" from now on. The one in "Village" blew up in his face and since the film depended on it working it deep sixed the whole film.
I think the guy has talent, but he goes to the "Twist Ending" well too often.
One problem he has is that if people are expecting a twist ending, it is harder to pull one off, and people have come to expect a twist ending in a Shylaman film, ironically making it harder to pull off.
I thought it was a step ahead for him when he did not have a twist ending in "Signs", and a huge step back when he went back to that well in "Village".
I agree that Howard's music was one of the strong points in "The Village", maybe the strongest thing about the film.
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#46
I really don't get the point of attacking the guy for his films. Leave him alone and take the pressure off of him. He's probably under enough pressure as it is with his next film, if the box office fails to show again he might have trouble getting funding for anything he makes after.

And I think he's stuck in the spotlight right now and may not want to be. Studio's and the general public have labled him as the twist ending guy and at first he went along with it because it sold tickets, but now he's finding out how boxed in he really is. Probably realizing that no matter what kind of film he makes the studio will still market it as from the director of Sixth Sense and Signs rather than try to maket it on it's story alone. Which means that even though his next film may not be a thriller, the thriller crowd will be the first to see it and start the word of mouth on it.
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#47
This guy's made four straight big budget studio films in which nothing ponderously happens, and THE VILLAGE was a literal insult, one without the balls to end with, "Stupid fucking white people." I'm done with him.
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#48
I suggest you look up the correct usage for the term literal.
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#49
Quote:

Originally Posted by Sleeplesslumber

I suggest you look up the correct usage for the term literal.

No, no, I'm pretty sure I meant what I said.
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#50

With "The Visit" being a modest success, and "Split" receiving ok buzz heading into next week's release, is Shyamalan making a comeback?

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#51

Yep!  He's making movies he should be making.



Gotta give him credit.  He financed The Visit on his own dime and that paid off quite a bit.

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#52

I thought THE VISIT was a Blumhouse production (in that it was made according to Blumhouse's business model).



Did M. Night put more of his own money to bump up the budget from that?

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#53

He's almost there!



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#54
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

I thought THE VISIT was a Blumhouse production (in that it was made according to Blumhouse's business model).



Did M. Night put more of his own money to bump up the budget from that?


Blumhouse came in later to release and tweak the film, but he financed the 5M himself and shot it in 30 days.



Filmed In 30 Days: According to Business Insider, Shyamalan filmed "The Visit," in 30 days with a $5 million budget and 25 crew members. He wanted to shoot the movie fast, just as he directed the pilot episode of Fox's "Wayward Pines." "'Wayward Pines' really gave me a sense of how to shoot fast and with a kind of leaner, tighter mentality because that’s what TV demands,” he said. Shyamalan also personally financed the $5 million for the movie himself.

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#55

I didn't see The Visit. I've heard some really good stuff about that and Split though.



I'm ready to let Shyamalan back into my heart. I can't resist a tale of someone destroying their career and slowly clawing their way back by actually making good stuff again.

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#56

Having had my Shamamamalayan fire rekindled by The Visit, I'm actually quite looking forward to Split. Been hearing good things about it.

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#57
Quote:

Originally Posted by Paul C View Post
 

I didn't see The Visit. I've heard some really good stuff about that and Split though.



I'm ready to let Shyamalan back into my heart. I can't resist a tale of someone destroying their career and slowly clawing their way back by actually making good stuff again.


You should.  It's a nice little comeback for him.  Really can't wait for Split

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#58

EVERYBODY loves a good comeback narrative!




we can make them...



AND THEN WE CAN BREAK THEM...



and then LIFT THEM UP AGAIN!!!

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#59
Quote:

Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post
 

EVERYBODY loves a good comeback narrative!




we can make them...



AND THEN WE CAN BREAK THEM...



and then LIFT THEM UP AGAIN!!!


So true.  He made some horrible choices, but he's seems to realize his sweet spot again.

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