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The return of Ambler: New Youtube Channel
I can see why someone would find your voice monotonous in the sea of "fuckin' youtube voice and youtube face"...

but I find it calming and authoritative.
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(12-02-2020, 10:20 PM)Nooj Wrote: I can see why someone would find your voice monotonous in the sea of "fuckin' youtube voice and youtube face"...

but I find it calming and authoritative.

[Image: 67b4fd44934af1ae5debb0b303654eb4.jpg]
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Well, in the CHUDmultiverse they say -- that the Ambler's vocal cords grew three sizes that day.  And then -- the true meaning of narration came through, and Ambler's voice found the calming authoritativeness of TEN Amblers, plus two!

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(12-02-2020, 10:20 PM)Nooj Wrote: I can see why someone would find your voice monotonous in the sea of "fuckin' youtube voice and youtube face"...

but I find it calming and authoritative.

I agree.  I wouldn't change it.
"Whose advice are you going to take in show business, Judd Apatow or me?" - Norm Macdonald
 


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(12-03-2020, 10:33 PM)subotai Wrote:
(12-02-2020, 10:20 PM)Nooj Wrote: I can see why someone would find your voice monotonous in the sea of "fuckin' youtube voice and youtube face"...

but I find it calming and authoritative.

I agree.  I wouldn't change it.

Thanks man
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
Reply
Top Youtuber Chris Stuckmann and I ponder the fate of movie theaters after Warner Bros' bombshell announcement, in this inaugural episode of my new Under The Hood series... which will feature conversations with filmmakers, actors, and movie aficionados.  Excited to debut this.  



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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you’re associated with stuckmann? NOOOOOO youtube face thumbnail!!!

But congrats!
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Stuckmann's a great guy. Thanks.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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I listened!

Good discussion!
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Yeah, good talk. It's amazing how today's youth are completely disconnected from the cinematic experience. I remember us having a total blast at not only the T2-tier blockbusters but fare like Best of the Best 2. Aside from the arrival of Thor in A:IW or a similar epic moment, it doesn't seem like that communal experience, like Ebert talks about at the end of Life Itself, really exists for people anymore. Maybe people use social media as a proxy, but if so, I don't think that it's an effective one. TBH I don't really expect to experience it again for the reasons you guys discuss.
"Whose advice are you going to take in show business, Judd Apatow or me?" - Norm Macdonald
 


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I love seeing movies in theaters. I know a lot of people who love movies that don't care for that experience anymore due to the shitty behavior of modern audiences, and I don't question their experience or their reaction to it. A solid and affordable home theater setup has been a great replacement for them. I count myself lucky in that my experiences in the theater have never gotten to the point that pushes me that far away from them. Aside from minor annoyances, my theatrical experiences have been largely pleasant on average.

But as much as I've invested into big TVs and a robust sound system, I still loved going to the theater to see whatever was out. Good stuff. Middling stuff. Bad stuff. Thanks to Moviepass and the AMC A-List subscription that came along later, I went to the theater a LOT over the past several years.

Seeing a movie playing on a large screen a distance away from me gives me a very different sensation from sitting in my room watching a big screen, certainly. I don't deny that effect and I've seen plenty of movies in empty auditoriums.

But it's really the communal experience subotai refers to that I kept chasing with the theatrical context. I love it so much that I'm perfectly happy to be bamboozled into thinking a movie is better than it actually is by absorbing the energy of a good crowd and pristine presentation (I can always change my mind later). I don't even mind sporadic chatter during a movie depending on the context as long as it's not non-stop conversation. Just hearing murmurs from an engaged audience (or maybe even disengaged/frustrated) is also a part of how I experience a movie's effect on the audience's 'energy'.

Even during COVID, I drove about an hour away to go see TENET at one of the only theaters in my state to try opening up again back at the beginning of September. When more theaters attempted to open up again, I went to see TENET again for the heck of it. I also went to see MEMORIES OF MURDER and AKIRA. As far as communal experiences go, it was lacking due to the pandemic (lower attendance and masked audiences), but it was still really nice. My friend and I had the entire theater to ourselves for AKIRA, and we happily talked, laughed, and enjoyed ourselves.

I completely respect those that are doing their part to isolate during the pandemic and choose to stay away from theaters despite their love for it. But as a part of a family that has been running an essential business that serves a diverse population of customers daily, my sense of risk about going to the theater is different from those who can work from home in lockdown.
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The right kind of crowd can elevate something beautifully. Most of my own examples are usually from the 90's. One personal favorite is from 'True Lies'

"You know my handcuffs? I picked them."

(Audience laughter)

Torture tool goes flying into guard's eye

(Audience laughter then immediately turns into a loud "OHHHHHH!!!!")

Hell, even something like Forwakens was instructive in how I reacted to it. I got carried along by the goodwill of the audience for the first 30-40 minutes, until I had my own personal break from the movie, and silently became annoyed at that same audience goodwill.
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Thanks for sharing guys.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
Reply
There is NOTHING like the crowd response at the climax of Rear Window.

Jeff sees that Lisa has the ring:

"Ooh!"

Jeff sees that Thorwald sees it too:

"Ohh!"

Thorwald sees Jeff:

"oooOOOOWWWAAAAAGGHH"
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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Chadwick Boseman's untimely passing is no reason to eliminate T'Challa from his own franchise, Black Panther. I make the case for recasting the part in my latest video.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Filmmakers like Denis Villeneuve and Christopher Nolan have recently blasted Warner Bros. for sacrificing the future of theaters for their own selfish aims.  In my latest Under The Hood episode, Britney Salyer and I discuss why the theatrical experience is so vital to the art form of cinema, and why Alamo Drafthouse is its greatest champion. (apologies for the feedback in some of the audio in the first 41 minutes, it is fixed after that)



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
Reply
Paul Verhoeven seemingly made a recruitment video for fascism and people couldn't handle it.  Starship Troopers committed the sin of believing critics and audiences would be savvy enough to understand the deep levels of satire involved.  They didn't and the movie bombed.  But people are finally coming around and realizing how brilliant it is, and in my latest I explain why Starship Troopers was the end of an era in which Hollywood bankrolled big budget, unapologetically provocative movies.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Starship Troopers arced cleanly over my head in 1997.  My youngest brother (who was still in high school) watched it and suggested I give it another crack.  It wasn't my first time realizing my initial read of something was way off, and it won't be my last.

Even then, I didn't consciously realize until your video that Rico never once makes an active decision through the whole film.
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I had just learned about satire in high school English that year

great timing!
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Brilliant work once again! I wasn't pro-music bed when you first brought it up but the mellow jazzhop actually works really nicely against violent Verhoeven footage and unsettling fascist propaganda images, so I'm glad you knew better than to take my advice.
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(12-16-2020, 03:59 PM)Bucho Wrote: Brilliant work once again! I wasn't pro-music bed when you first brought it up but the mellow jazzhop actually works really nicely against violent Verhoeven footage and unsettling fascist propaganda images, so I'm glad you knew better than to take my advice.

LOL!
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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For anyone who's ever been passionate about something, creative or not, I highly recommend checking out my interview with filmmaker Nick Murphy, not just because it's my channel, but because this is one of the most honest, heartfelt and emotional conversations I've had with another human. The only thing that surpasses Nick's determination as a filmmaker is his love and passion for the art of cinema... it bleeds all over this episode.  And wait 'til you hear his crazy James Cameron and JJ Abrams stories!



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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oooh 2 hours!
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Yeap, this one went on for a while because it was such an engrossing conversation and he had alot to say. I hadn't really spoken to Nick voice to voice since film school, so part of it was just catching up.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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yessssss
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I've been so caught up in other malarkey (aka watching Mandalorian Finale reaction videos like any sane person) I've still only heard the first 20 min, but so far so good. That dude's energy is infectious!
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(12-19-2020, 01:32 PM)Bucho Wrote: I've been so caught up in other malarkey (aka watching Mandalorian Finale reaction videos like any sane person) I've still only heard the first 20 min, but so far so good. That dude's energy is infectious!

It's long, but I feel really worth listening to the whole thing... this episode inspired me to start writing again.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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it's a very raw episode! I'm not finished with it yet, but it's raw!
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Sometimes the best way to go in is raw!
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
Reply
Just finished it. Good for you for letting Nick unload, it was the right way to go. You can hear your friend’s odyssey and it’s costs in his voice. He’s asked himself those tough questions we all ask ourselves at some point. I sure hope his film gets its shot.
"Whose advice are you going to take in show business, Judd Apatow or me?" - Norm Macdonald
 


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I wanna see his film!
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Out of all the video essays I've done, this is the most special to me... with the possible exception of the original (non special edition) Star Wars trilogy, E.T. galvanized my passion for cinema like no other film.  In the realm of influential filmmakers, Spielberg is at or near the top of the list for me.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
Reply
Perhaps unconsciously, your clip selection highlights the film's use of silhouette. E.T.'s cinematographer, Allen Daviau, passed away this year.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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I probably won't be able to bring myself to thumbs up a video which claims anything other than Jaws is Spielberg's best, but I'll watch it!
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I know it's weird posting a horror movie on Christmas, but 2020 has been full of weirdness!  Filmmaker Anthony Cousins, one of the directors of the anthology horror film Scare Package, stopped by to talk with me about the genius of The Blair Witch Project, a film that has stayed with me ever since I saw it in a theater in Orlando, Florida back in 1999.  



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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