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The Semi-Official Heavy Metal Thread
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I've had some time to myself recently, which has been nice.  I've been wanting to do more rundowns of band's full discographies ever since I dove into Metallica and AC/DC over the summer.  

I started with Megadeth.  Some of these albums hadn't gotten spins in forever, so I figured it was time to dust them off.

A few thoughts before getting into the albums....

- Quality-wise, you never really know what to expect from Dave by the time you reach Risk.  The band will release two bad albums in a row, and then something above average pops up unexpectedly.  It keeps me on my toes, I guess.  The band's revolving door of guitarists/drummers certainly plays a hand.

- Lyrically, the albums definitely delve into Alex Jones territory post-9/11.  Sometimes, Dave jettisons that stuff, but he often can't help himself.  The conspiratorial stuff can be pretty distracting.  Maybe others don't mind those lyrics.

- Kiko Loureiro will hopefully stick around for a long time.

- I, of course, prefer the band's thrash days, but the more straightforward metal stuff was pretty inspired, especially in the 90s.  I actually appreciate that era more now after this rundown.

Okay, here we go:

It's no secret that Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good! barely had a budget.  Some appreciate that rawness.  I always thought the weaker production of Iron Maiden's self-titled was a major benefit, for instance.  Here, I'm not the biggest fan of the mix.  There are some sick riffs on this album, but they get kind of lost.  Dave's vocals, too.  It's probably the purest thrash album in the Megadeth catalog, though, and the songs are simply undeniable, bad production or not.  "Last Rites/Loved to Deth" is definitely the biggest highlight.  Dave's anger was never more palpable, and the ballistic speed tethered to the punk attitude is just fucking cool.  My copy unfortunately has the censored version of "These Boots," which gets pretty annoying, but it's still as fist pumping as everything else here.

Peace Sells... But Who's Buying? fixes all the production issues with the first album and then fucking some.  Every song has a unique touch, and just about everything is a major highlight.  "Wake Up Dead" is one of the best intro tracks on any metal album; the second half is just the coolest too.  The title track allows Dave's personality to spill through, giving the band the spin that other trash bands could never grasp.  "Good Mourning/Black Friday" is the best song - and the most brutal thing in the whole discography.  Maybe the "I Ain't Superstitious" cover isn't necessary, but it does what I wish all covers did: recontextualizes the song.  This one's not my favorite Megadeth album, but it's probably the one I've listened to the most.

So Far, So Good... So What! is a mixed bag, and another iffy production doesn't help matters.  Regardless, the highs on this albums are so fucking high.  "Into the Lungs of Hell" is an explosive opener, "In My Darkest Hour" adds another layer to Megadeth's arsenal, "Liar" continues to be one of the most underrated tracks in the catalog and "Hook in Mouth" is just a beast.  I agree with most that the Sex Pistols cover wasn't a great idea, even if it's kind of fun to listen to individually; it doesn't flow well with the album.  There's nothing bad here, but the rest just rests comfortably.  It's definitely one of those rare albums where I think the second half outshines the first.

Rust in Peace is legendary.  Top to bottom, there isn't a thing I'd change.  Dave's snarl really shines here, and the rhythm is perfect; seriously, the band is just on fire.  Everyone knows the big hits here, so I'll focus on the rest.  "Poison Was the Cure" has one of the coolest, most unique intros ever.  Impressively, I'd almost call "Lucretia" the best thing on the whole album.  "Take No Prisoners" literally takes no prisoners; it just quickly storms the castle and leaves, which was a great decision after the meatier duo that opens RIP.  This is Megadeth's magnum opus, and easily one of the best metal albums ever.  I know some people who think this one outshines every Metallica and Slayer record; I personally think Master of Puppets, Ride the Lightning and Reign in Blood are better.  Thrash was just amazing around the time.

As a kid, Countdown to Extinction was untouchable.  I eventually realized Megadeth had better stuff, but this attempt to capture some Black Album magic is still very good.  Yeah, there's some filler, but the band rounds all the bases of metal here.  "Architecture Of Aggression" gets a little proggy, for instance.  Groove and funk metal both get their moments too.  I really like the title track, but the true standout continues to be "Ashes in Your Mouth."  In fact, "Ashes" is the band's best song post-Rust in Peace.  I think Dave gets a little silly on "Sweating Bullets," even if I still enjoy the song.  I'm still kind of tired of "Symphony of Destruction" too.  For shows, I don't think it would kill the band to bring back "This Was My Life" or "High Speed Dirt," instead of the usual singles.  Those songs were barely played live for some reason.

My opinion went higher on Youthanasia than any other album during this rundown.  I always considered this one the weaker, little brother of Countdown.  Now?  I think they're pretty much on equal standing.  This one struggles to find something as tangibly great as "Ashes in Your Mouth," but the catchier inclinations don't come off as forced this time around.  I enjoy this batch of singles more, and feel like a few more of these songs could've carried the band through another year of promotion.  Like, "Addicted to Chaos" is catchy as hell (maybe a little long for the radio, but it could've been edited), and it's beyond perplexing that it's not a concert staple.  Tracks like "Elysian Fields," ""I Thought I Knew it All" and "Black Curtains" could've had longer shelf lives too.  Do I even need to mention "Reckoning Day?"  That song might not have been a single, but you could've fooled me with all the play it gets through various outlets.

Cryptic Writings sort of suffers from the law of diminishing returns, even if I think it's better than its reputation.  In fact, things get a bit more thrashy this time around, which is cool.  "The Disintegrators," "Vortex" and "FFF" are unheralded gems in the Megadeth catalog in that respect.  "She Wolf" is great and shockingly not a single.  Like, how the hell did that track get bypassed for "A Secret Place?"  I don't even mind "Place," but what a weird choice!  I prefer the other singles with "Trust" and "Use the Man" leading the charge.  Elsewhere, things get a little bluesy.  There are semblances of blues in "I'll Get Even," which I've always had a soft spot for.  "Have Cool, Will Travel" has some harmonica, an underrated and underused instrument in metal.  You'd think more bands would incorporate the harmonica after Black Sabbath showed everyone the way with "The Wizard."

I'm not rocking the boat by calling Risk a bad album.  Many people - Mustaine included - think this one would've been better received as a solo record, but I don't really care about that stuff.  It's not like the band hadn't already changed a lot before Risk.  The truth was Cryptic Writings was a big success, having four singles that penetrated rock radio.  And Marty Friedman wanted to experiment with poppier stuff around this time too.  The singles work best - well, mostly.  I still think "Crush 'Em" sounds too forced, for instance.  "Insomnia" and "Breadline" are fine songs, though, and exactly the type of Megadeth tracks you'd want to spin if you're getting tired of the usual stuff.  Sadly, Dave's smarter brand of poppy lyrical content is pretty much absent here.  I feel like Dave wrote "I'll Be There" in his sleep, and "Wanderlust" is a weird ripoff of Fleetwood Mac and Bon Jovi.  "Prince of Darkness" is pretty cool, for the record.

The World Needs a Hero still has some poppy inclinations, but the band clearly dropped the Risk sound for something more traditional.  It's not a very adventurous album, and I think there's a lot of rehashed ideas here.  To be fair, "1000 Times Goodbye" does try something different with its broken romance, but it just plods along.  I do like "Disconnect" and its laid-back instrumental section.  "Dread and the Fugitive Mind" is cool too, even if its reusing lyrics.  Honestly, I prefer Risk.  The band just isn't that inspired here.  And the occasional good ideas are drowned out by bad ones.  Oh, and did we really need a sequel to "Hangar 18?"

Oh yeah, this is the stuff.  The System Has Failed is the best latter-day Megadeth record.  The album nicely veers back and forth between thrash and traditional metal with a vastly-improved batch of melodies compared to The World Needs a Hero.  Every song works, some better than others.  "Blackmail the Universe," "Kick the Chair" and "Back in the Day" scratch the thrash itch quite well.  "The Scorpion," the third single, brings a new type of songwriting to the band, and a lot of people think it's the album's best cut.  The other singles are super catchy and fun; "Die Dead Enough" would be a radio mainstay in a fairer world.  The laid-back drawl of "Of Mice and Men" is still great too, and gives me flashbacks of the Cryptic Writings days.  Seriously, what's not to like here?

United Abominations is when Dave starts getting really conspiratorial, so I need to focus on other stuff.  Thankfully, the album is very guitar-driven and tries to ape the successful formula of The System Has Failed.  Does it work?  Yeah, sort of.  The quality drops in the second half of the album, but there are some solid highlights here.  The one-two punch of "Sleepwalker" and "Washington Is Next!" is a poor man's version of "Holy Wars... The Punishment Due" and "Hangar 18," but that's not necessarily a bad thing.  "Never Walk Alone...A Call To Arms" should've been a single.  Speaking of singles, the only one on here is the "A Tout Le Monde" remake with Lacuna Coil's Cristina Scabbia on guest vocals; I'm still confused by that addition.  I'm pretty sure "Gears of War" was used to promote the video game series, though, so maybe that counts (I like that track more than most, I think).  I'd say just about every song has a good idea or two, so I never feel like getting too mean.  It's an average release.

I actually forgot how much I enjoy Endgame.  Fresh ears after many years made for a delightful experience.  I prefer The System Has Failed, but Endgame is riding its coattails regarding latter-day releases.  This is the thrashiest release in a long time.  Yes, there are catchy choruses and melodies, but the band never really slows down on this release outside of "Bodies" and "The Right to Go Insane" (and the first half of "The Hardest Part Of Letting Go...Sealed With A Kiss," naturally); all solid tracks, by the way.  I dig the return to form, even if none of these songs are going to match Rust in Peace's highest highs.  Still, stuff like "This Day We Fight!," "1,320'" and "Head Crusher" totally smoke.  The title track is probably the weakest track for me; the conspiratorial lyrics don't help, but the song's longer than it needs to be.  All the other tracks are brief, and that brevity is one the album's finest qualities.

Thirteen includes some older tracks, which makes sense since it always came off as a B-sides project to me.  There are people who think this album is underrated, and I can kind of understand the sentiment since some of the reworked tracks are good/very good.  Does the album flow well, though?  Eh, no, I don't think so.  A lot of the new material comes off as unfinished or downright bad.  "Guns, Drugs, & Money" might be my least favorite Megadeth song, and "Fast Lane" is barely better.  "Never Dead" is cool, though, and "Deadly Nightshade" is far and away the best of the newer songs.  Corralling all the tracks, my favorite is actually "Black Swan," which almost made United Abominations.; that one feels like it would've slotted beautifully on Youthanasia.  The reworkings of "New World Order" and "Millennium Of The Blind" are solid too.

Risk often gets the dishonor of being Megadeth's worst album, but I think Super Collider deserves the nod.  Look, there's nothing wrong with a band going "commercial."  The band's successfully gone down that route numerous times, but the more egregious examples always fall flat since Dave ends up dumbing down his lyrics and the songs sound forced.  Opening with the thrashy "Kingmaker" - easily the best song here - doesn't help either since it's just a tease.  Generic stuff like "Burn!" and "Off the Edge" is instantly forgettable (and not alone, sadly).  The slide guitar on the Southern-like "The Blackest Crow" is kind of cool, though, so the album's not completely devoid of new ideas.  I think the title track and "Forget to Remember" are fairly catchy, and "Dance in the Rain" is actually a big highlight; that ending with Disturbed's David Draiman is really powerful.  

Kiko Loureiro is the secret weapon of Dystopia, a rock-solid album that got Megadeth back on track.  His dueling solos with Dave are refreshing and creative.  Dave is just fully ensconced in InfoWars lyricism here, so it's really important that the album mostly works musically.  The band is very tight, and a few new ideas get thrown in for good measure too.  The intro to Conquer or Die  is lovely, for instance.  And "Poisonous Shadows" has its share of keyboards; it's an epic song and my favorite one next to the title track.  "Foreign Policy" brings back that old-school punk feel to close things out, which is cool.  The first half is stronger, though.  "The Threat Is Real," "Fatal Illusion" and "Bullet to the Brain" help kick things into gear.  

Here's the ranking along with the best song on each album:

1. Rust in Peace - "Holy Wars...The Punishment Due"
2. Peace Sells... But Who's Buying? - "Good Mourning/Black Friday"
3. Countdown to Extinction - "Ashes in Your Mouth"
4. Youthanasia - "Addicted to Chaos"
5. So Far, So Good... So What! - "In My Darkest Hour"
6. Killing Is My Business... And Business Is Good!  - "Last Rites/Loved To Deth"
7. The System Has Failed - "Kick the Chair"
8. Endgame - "Head Crusher"
9. Cryptic Writings - "Trust"
10. Dystopia - "Dystopia"
11. United Abominations - "Sleepwalker"
12. Thirteen - "Black Swan"
13. Risk - "Breadline"
14. The World Needs a Hero - "Disconnect"
15. Super Collider - "Kingmaker"
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I found this to be an amazing listen; I never realised how much Chris Poland was soloing all over the place on Peace Sells. The guy had his demons, but man he is AMAZING. His runs are fast as hell and he's got a legato sound on them, contrasting nicely with Mustaines sharp attack.


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QX6SNAqQ2uY

A Hawaiian shirt is like a cash gift - always appropriate
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not sure where else to put this but I think people have posted NIN in here.

Here's the new track from Gary Numan.  Really, really digging it a lot.


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Ice linked to this song the other day. From 4 years ago- Can't believe I hadn't heard it before! 






It builds and builds before going full Megadeth..

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Ever since Agent Steel's Juan Garcia joined Body Count, they've been on a roll. Their last three albums are great. Body Count never managed to keep up the quality before, but this lineup is kicking ass and taking names consistently.
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(01-14-2021, 07:51 PM)Judas Booth Wrote: not sure where else to put this but I think people have posted NIN in here.

Here's the new track from Gary Numan.  Really, really digging it a lot.


JB, I know I've let you down by not digging some of your recommendations but that's a great track. It really hits a lot of buttons for me.

It actually reminds me of this track, which I found via Spotify last year. Give it the whole length. It's a bit of a slow burn but the second half of the song is joyously epic and throbbing and bombastic.

It's also so much better heard either with earbuds or a great set speakers with good bass.



"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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The FBI finally arrested Jon Schaffer, and the list of charges is long:

https://variety.com/2021/music/news/meta...234887239/

Quote:Guitarist Jon Schaffer, a founding member of the metal band Iced Earth, has been taken into custody in his home state of Indiana after making “wanted” lists as a result of his widely seen participation in pro-Trump forces’ siege of the U.S. Capitol.

News outlets including the Indianapolis Star have reported that Schaffer turned himself in to the FBI Sunday afternoon, 11 days after the deadly insurrection in Washington, D.C.

Schaffer’s notoriety in the metal community and an unusually long, white goatee got him singled out quickly in the wake of the invasion as a man seen in photos screaming inside the Capitol building after its barriers were breached.

Among the charges, according to Indianapolis FBI spokeswoman Chris Bavender, are that Schaffer “engag(ed) in an act of physical violence in a Capitol building.” The FBI rep additionally told the Star that the musician was “allegedly with a group of rioters who used bear spray against Capitol police.”

The full list of six charges on which Schaffer is being held:
  • “Knowingly Entering or Remaining in any Restricted Building or Grounds Without Lawful Authority”
  • “Disrupting the Orderly Conduct of Government Business”
  • “Knowingly Engages in an Act of Physical Violence Against any Person or Property in any Restricted Building or Grounds”
  • “Violent Entry and Disorderly Conduct in a Capitol Building”
  • “Engage in an Act of Physical Violence in a Capitol Building”
  • “Parade, Demonstrate, or Picket in a Capitol Building”

Why such an easily identifiable figure hadn’t been arrested earlier was a mystery to many. On Jan. 14, the website Metalsucks.net wrote, “I can’t think of a sensitive way to say this, so I’ll just say it insensitively: Why the fuck hasn’t Iced Earth’s Jon Schaffer been arrested yet?!? The Indiana native was clearly visible in a widely-circulated photo of the pro-Trump mob that stormed the Capitol last week, whereupon he was identified by pretty much every metal media outlet in the world.”
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'Do you like Metallica?'




[Image: tenor.gif]
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Schaffer's always been a right wing nutjob but I didn't expect him to be storming the U.S. Capital Building of all things. What a fucking goof!

That being said all the Iced Earth you need is the Days of Purgatory (2 CD version) which features the best lineup of IE doing a fantastic re-recording of earlier material. Then ALIVE IN ATHENS (3 CD version) which is arguably one of the best live metal albums ever recorded. Then HORROR SHOW, the final album with Matt Barlowe on lead vocals.

Anyways, I watched a DVD I only watched a bit of way back in 2006 in its' entirety last night: RAINBOW: Live in Munich 1977. Holy crap what a concert. Can't believe I waited so long to check it out but I'm glad I did.
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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Richie Kotzen and Iron Maiden's Adrian Smith have a blues rock collaboration coming out in a few months.  Here's the music video for the first single:



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The Smith/Kotzen tune is good. It leans more towards Kotzen's brand of bluesy hard rock, but it works.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Wow, Adrian Smith is a pretty damn good singer. I mean, obviously Maiden isn't going to let him sing something ahead of Dickinson, but it's a good solid voice.

A Hawaiian shirt is like a cash gift - always appropriate
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The 2020 review issue of Classic Rock magazine praised Blue Oyster Cult latest CD The Symbol Remains. They wrote one of the stand out tracks was Florida Man. I think that BOC getting their ideas from Google alerts about Florida instead of B movies and science fiction is a good way to sum up the current state of the world.
[video=youtube]http://[/video]
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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I was happy to see BOC back with a new album.  Is there a more underrated band in rock/metal?
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I wouldn't call Thin Lizzy underrated, but its a damn shame that most people only know The Boys Are Back in Town and Jailbreak. Even Sirius XM's Ozzy's Boneyard is guilty of this. Emerald would be a great fit for that station's format.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Holy balls is this good.



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Recently I listened Dio's Killing the Dragon. While Dio has made better albums, it's still good. Rock N Roll is one of the stand out tracks. Its about how after 9/11 Clear Channel made sure no political songs or anything that might make people think of the attack where not played on their stations. I give him a lot of credit for knowing this was a bad idea. At the time I knew about it but I was too sad and freaked out by the attack to give it much thought.  The Chicks(back then The Dixie Chicks) and Howard Stern getting screwed by Clear Channel is when I realized I should have been more concerned earlier. On a less serious note Better in the Dark and Killing the Dragon rock.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Alice Cooper Detroit Stories: It's in the vein of the original Alice Cooper band's albums. It's mostly hard rock/garage rock, with some hints of punk, but it does throw some curveballs. One of my favorite songs is the funky $1000 High Heel Shoes. It's about a dude who knows he is spending too much money at the strip club, but he can't stop going there. Our Love Will Change the World has an arrangement and a chorus that sounds like The Beatles but lyrics are all about cynicism.

  There is a lot of off beat humor. Drunk and In Love is a bluesy tune about a homeless man in love. I Hate You features the original line up singing about how they can't stand each other. One of the lyrics is: "You're the king of America/but you're no Jeff Beck." It has a weirdly touching line about Glen Buxton: "But most of all we're filled with rage at the empty place you left on stage."   Buxton died in 97.

  Alice is already planning his next record. He wants to write and record it next time he tours.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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These last few posts remind me of a lot of bands/albums I need to catch up with! 

So I've been going through Judas Priest's entire discography of late. Of course I know Halford's legendary vocals and heard the main singles (Breaking the Law, Another Thing Coming), but never sat down to hear their entire albums. Really liking what I'm hearing. 

My favorites so far: Stained Class, Hell Bent for Leather, British Steel, Screaming for Vengeance, Defenders of the Faith and Painkiller (listened to the latter twice already!). 

Currently going through the Ripper Owens era. I like Jugulator and think its underrated. Demolition seems OK.
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Plus Ripper appears to be a pretty great guy.

I've basically concluded any list of "Great Heavy Metal Songs" that doesn't have "Victim of Changes" in the top 5 is invalid.

A Hawaiian shirt is like a cash gift - always appropriate
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I've seen Ripper sing live three times: twice with Priest and once with Dio's Disciples. I could tell he was having a blast singing his favorite songs. I'll never forget the first time I saw Priest with Ripper. As The Hellion was playing he was standing on the drum riser staring at the crowd with laser focus. I was in awe as soon as he sang the first line of Electric Eye. I knew his backstory about being in a Priest tribute, but I was still shocked that he sounded just like Halford.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Ravi, reading your post made me go through my stuff and dig out my old Painkiller CD. God, this was such a great album. Metal perfected.

"YOU'RE POSSESSING ME" = chills
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Painkiller rocks. If their career had ended there, it would have been the perfect capper.

That said, their last album, Firepower, is quite solid in my opinion.
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Tony Iommi isn't thrilled, but Geoff Nichols' stepson shared "Slapback" to YouTube a few days ago.  "Slapback" is a Dio-era Black Sabbath tune that was recorded during the Heaven and Hell sessions.  

Nichols' stepson found it on a cassette, and a link can be found at the article:

https://www.blabbermouth.net/news/tony-i...-slapback/

Quote:Tony Iommi says that he is "not at all happy" about the release of the Ronnie James Dio-era BLACK SABBATH song titled "Slapback" which was uploaded to YouTube several days ago.

Gary Rees, the stepson and executor of the estate of SABBATH's longtime keyboardist Geoff Nicholls, shared the track last Friday (March 5), writing in an accompanying message that he had found it on a cassette tape that contained other material recorded during SABBATH's 1979 songwriting sessions for the following year's album "Heaven And Hell".

Asked in an interview with SiriusXM's "Trunk Nation With Eddie Trunk" on Thursday (March 11) what he could remember anything about this purportedly unreleased tune, Iommi said: "I'm not at all happy with [Nicholls's estate releasing the song] — at all. And it's left a really bad taste in my mouth. At that point, when we did that, Geoff wasn't even involved in the band; I hadn't even got Geoff over at that time. That is actually Ronnie playing bass on that… And that was just in the lounge recorded on a cassette."

As for why "Slapback" never saw the light of day before, Iommi said: "We had one or two things that we'd jam around on and play on and stuff, but it [wasn't] right for the album, so we didn't put it into shape; we didn't record it [properly] or anything," he explained.
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On topic, I just read Halford's autobiography, and he comes across as a pretty amazing guy in it. Really matter-of-fact and so far as I can tell honest, because he is willing to relate stories where he's a bit of an idiot/asshole. He also makes it sound like the rest of the fellows in Priest are decent enough people as well.

It isn't THE BEST EVER but it's a pretty breezy read, and I tore through it in a couple days.

A Hawaiian shirt is like a cash gift - always appropriate
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Before Dave got kicked out of Metallica, he was also kicked out of the Jackson 5



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Listening to the re-mastered "Alive II" on Prime. Why does this record have such a bad rap? It's a pure adrenaline rush. Peter Criss was being phased out, but his playing throughout the record is fire. I might be nuts, but I think Ace does some EVH-style tapping on his solo at the climax of 'Shock Me'.




"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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I've never heard any negativity towards Alive 2. I prefer the first one, but it's still a high energy live record. I'm one of the few people that likes Alive 3 though. The Revenge album and tour is what got me into Kiss and the first time I listened to it was just like being back in Pittsburgh's Civic Arena.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Boring Autobiographical Pause: I grew up in Cherokee County, GA., so take that in mind. It was a mix of affluent suburbs & rural southern culture. I'm still in public school in 7th grade, and my closest friends were into Hip-Hop & Punk. I made this one friend that year (circa 85-86), that was really, really into KISS. His enthusiasm was infectious, and he'd bring the classic records for me to take home and spin. Sometimes I'd go over to his house and hang. He'd make mix tapes (Bromance!) Anyway, he was kind of preppie, but was also hanging with the metal head kids. They would mock him for his KISS fandom. Much like Motley Crue would sneer later, calling the music and the band gay/queer whatever (softening, terms used back were a lot more homophobic). I always admired this kid for never backing down; like getting into actual musical arguments about their merits.

Ironically, I remember the metal head leader thinking Poison (!) was better than they ever were. This was when that band's first record hit. This dumbass thought C.C. DeVille was the new guitar hero or something. (The 80's were a gotdamn bizarre time).

My friend made me a fan. Next year, I was in private school. And it was my turn to prophesize their greatness.

As a little kid, my parents were always playing The Beatles.

I'm 14, I'm all "Destroyer" is the 70's fucking "Sgt. Pepper's".

Going through the classic run again, they're both ridiculous and absolutely awesome. I still love those crazy guys!

Aside: In my experience, they're right behind VH, as a band girls dig almost as guys. If open to giving them a chance, they have as much fun. Projecting perhaps, but Chicks into KISS always seem(ed) hotter & cooler than those into like Bon Jovi and Def Leppard and all the wack hair shit. Kiss was astute celebrating female horniness!

Watching the "Alive IV" 'Beth' video on YT, it was charming to see the young kids and women my age and younger knowing all the words & singing along.

KISS Army forever!

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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(03-18-2021, 08:18 PM)Fat Elvis Wrote: Listening to the re-mastered "Alive II" on Prime. Why does this record have such a bad rap? It's a pure adrenaline rush. Peter Criss was being phased out, but his playing throughout the record is fire. I might be nuts, but I think Ace does some EVH-style tapping on his solo at the climax of 'Shock Me'.

From what I understand, ALIVE II has a mixed reputation because at least some of it isn't live. Some songs - not sure how many - are actually from sound checks, with crowd noises dubbed in. Plus it's only three sides, with the fourth side being "new" songs of wildly varying quality.
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I forgot my whole point: even my friend wasn't big on 'Alive II'. He was always "Alive' rules, 'Alive' is the greatest concert album ever, etc, etc.. My (false?) memory of 'Alive II' was it didn't kick as hard. I know I had that fatboy 2 discer in HS, but don't recall listening to it much. Anyway, hearing it now was a revelation. The re-mastering is excellent - take that track I posted above "Shock Me". That vintage vinyl cut sounds a bit murky. The re-mastering is full raw power.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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The vast majority of live albums have studio overdubs. Aerosmith Live Bootleg is one of the few that doesn't have any; it's all soundboard recordings. I recently learned Frampton Comes Alive doesn't have many overdubs.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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Enjoy.





The inclusion of VANISHING POINT and (I think) DUEL to flesh this out is pretty great.
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The Pretty Reckless Death by Rock N Roll: The main reason I recommend this CD is because it rocks! A more thoughtful look at the album is that it does a good job of discussing death, grief and persevering after a loved one has passed away. IMO the standout  songs aren't heavy at all. 25 not only sounds like an outstanding Bond theme, its at least as good as Skyfall. Rock N Roll Heaven is a good mid-tempo love letter to rock n roll. Harley Darling ends the album on a sad note, but it's a way played note. Back to the heavier songs, My Bones is killer; part of the song sounds like a heavy metal Blondie.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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