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Leigh Janiak's FEAR STREET Trilogy (2021)
#36
Ah dang I didn't know there was a thread for this. Oh well, there's my post from the new releases thread:

Just got through Fear Street '94, and the only thing I was thinking about while watching is how much I'd rather be watching Detention.  And it's not just because they're slasher films in a highschool settings, FS '94 does a lot of that irreverent style that Detention does, and there's a lot of similar moments between the two films.  I mean, both are films that are incredibly influenced by Scream (a movie I've actually never seen), but what I love about Detention is that Detention is a movie about "movies about horror films" where the insincerity is the point and turns from a parody of the slasher horror to a surpringly sweet story about kids dealing with their anxieties of living in a generation that seems like it's going nowhere.

'94 is not operating on that level.  Which is fine.  What isn't fine is that what it does do isn't particularly interesting.  It's main feature is the insincerity, every needle drop (and holy shit there are a ton) reminding you about how "awesome" the 90s is and weren't old films rad?  But it doesn't really do any of the things its sending up particularly well: The scares are non existent, and there's no bite to any of the kills, save for one admittedly gnarly one towards the end of the film.  And the characters are basically one-note cyphers; even for a horror film, at least make me give a shit for when a couple of them inevitably bite the dusts.  Special shout out goes to the main character who is a especially unlikable, who spends the majority of the film bitching about her ex.  

I didn't hate this, but I definitely felt I could have spent my time on something more entertaining.  Like Detention.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
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#37
I barely remember Detention because it was just a mish mash of pop culture references with no actual substance whatsoever.

FEAR STREET on the other hand feels like a proper 1990s horror film amped up to the next level and doesn't feel like a roomful of writers going "We should do a nod to this and make a reference to that and this and that other thing" that Detention was. The mythology established in 1994 is excellent and I can't wait to see how it plays out in the next two parts.

But hey, you've always got Detention.
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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#38
(07-06-2021, 10:13 PM)headless fett Wrote: I barely remember Detention because it was just a mish mash of pop culture references with no actual substance whatsoever.

FEAR STREET on the other hand feels like a proper 1990s horror film amped up to the next level and doesn't feel like a roomful of writers going "We should do a nod to this and make a reference to that and this and that other thing" that Detention was. The mythology established in 1994 is excellent and I can't wait to see how it plays out in the next two parts.

But hey, you've always got Detention.

How is that not what '94 is?  It literally is just a collection of tropes taking verbatim from other better slasher flicks.

And like I said before, Detention is well aware of what it's doing.  The nostalgia and nods is the point.  All '94 is just nostalgia for the sake of nostalgia.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
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#39
Detention is great
Fear Street 94 is great

I settled the argument
AIt's just tits and dragons. - Ian McShane on Game of Thones
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#40
I thought it was good, maybe very good, but not great (although it has a few great moments), but the next episode appeals to me a bit more with the late 70s setting and the always-rare on-screen kindercide, plus after looking her up I want to see all of the lead actress in motion I can. She's stunning. And yes, she's well over 18.
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#41
It's entertaining almost despite itself. Even with all its problems, and all the dumb shit, I still enjoyed it.
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#42
Just saw FEAR STREET 78. I think i prefer last week's entry better. Though the lead here is better.
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#43
Is there some rule that forbids 10 and 12 years olds getting an axe to the head on screen? Cuz what the fuck was that? I wanted to see campers get ripped to shreds. We had an all timer last week with the bread slicer kill and a good head bashing in. This week nothing.

Tough to have a great slasher film when the slashing happens off screen.
AIt's just tits and dragons. - Ian McShane on Game of Thones
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#44
Finished PART TWO: 1978.

Markedly different from 1994 in terms of its overall vibe, which is as it should be; one of the pleasures of the multi-timeframe premise of this trilogy is the ability to pay tribute to different eras of horror, and 1978 -- a year no doubt chosen in deference to HALLOWEEN -- hits some of the notes of a classic slasher from the first wave of the subgenre (’78 - ’81)... but not without a few added supernatural curveballs, and some advancement of the larger plot we last left in 1994.

It’s shot very well with warm summer hues, and we have a much stronger -- if mostly still just as broad -- roster of characters than in the previous installment; putting a bit of a more straight-arrow, Type-A character at the center adds a nice change of pace, and makes the bullies, weirdos, outcasts, and druggies gel more in contrast because there’s a different energy to bounce off of.

It moves at a slightly more leisurely clip, and it definitely tries to evoke the rhythms of an older film to at least a small extent, which I actually found kind of refreshing (it’s paced like a “real” movie), though this does also contribute to a slightly bloated running time.

It remains to be seen whether or not the totality of this trilogy will be something satisfying (PART THREE will have to pull a few things off in order for that to be the case), but in 1978’s strongest moments -- when it evokes bygone scary and summer camp movies, less so when it’s weaving connective tissue to a larger narrative -- it’s an entertaining time, and I thought it was, overall, superior to 1994 (despite there being no kills here that could even come close to the great one from ’94).
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#45
Is the music licensing budget for these things like 75 million bucks?

I think I liked this more than part 1, even if it was probably 10 minutes too long. Looking forward to seeing how they wrap it up.
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#46
Yeah, I don't know if Netflix has some kind of special needle drop fund, or something, but the licensing for this had to be expensive.

I was very impressed with the score for 1978. One might have thought that Marco Beltrami would get synthy as a nod to HALLOWEEN, but he actually drew heavily from Jerry Goldsmith's OMEN scores in terms of overall style.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#47
Cold Case was a tv show that had all kinds of licensed music, so it must not be too hard to get some stuff. They even kept it for the reruns...unlike some stuff like House and its theme song.

You want to hear crazy needle drops, go watch this Australia building show on Tubi called The Block.
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#48
I thought part 2 was pretty good. This one definitely felt more in line with the traditional slasher, thanks to the camp setting and time period / soundtrack. None of the kills top the bread cutter kill from 1994, but overall I thought this one was way more brutal. Lots of gruesome axe wounds, and children getting owned left and right. I'm intrigued by the pulsating lump of supernatural gunk. Also always love seeing Gillian Jacobs in stuff.

Slashers have never really been my thing - probably one of my least favorite subgenres - so its surprising that these are working for me. Very excited for part 3.
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#49
(07-10-2021, 11:31 AM)fuzzy dunlop Wrote: I'm intrigued by the pulsating lump of supernatural gunk.

That's the one thing that felt a little too potentially STRANGER THINGSy to me, but we'll see where it goes in PART THREE.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#50
Was it supposed to be some kind of reveal to the audience that Jacobs was Ziggy? I thought the switch was going to be that she was the older sister because I was tired and I couldn’t remember any character’s name.

Edit to add I mean I thought that’s where they were headed with it, when the older sister got annihilated I realized that wasn’t going to be the case.
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#51
I thought the movie clearly wanted us to think Jacobs was the older sister, and it came across as so obvious that I expected the reveal to ultimately end up being what it was.

I don't think it fully works in-universe, as the 1994 kids react in shock at the end of Jacobs telling the story... but how could Jacobs have maintained that surprise until the end of her telling? One of them says, "Wait, you're Ziggy?" So was Jacobs telling the story entirely in the third person? That's the only way I could see how she'd avoid making it clear right away which sister she really was.

But I get it, it's a "movie reveal" thing that we just shouldn't think too hard about.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#52
Yeah, for me the fake out looked like it was going the other way. And was there any explanation for all the clocks? Sorry, I had a long week. Some details got past me.
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#53
The trauma of the experience has given her some of kind of OCD... I guess?
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#54
While I prefer 1994 (I missed Skull Mask), this was still really good. None of the deaths outdid the bread slicer but I thought the death of the sister was pretty brutal. I also appreciated the eye candy courtesy of Joan the hippy chick. *Insert Banderas gif*

Next week looks like some good old-fashioned puritanical horror so I'm looking forward to it.
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"We're not all masters of our souls, Meacham...I learned that on Earth."
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#55
Enjoyed the heck out of 1978. I think the slightly slower pacing worked better for me.

I usually hate watching kids get hurt or die but there's something about the tone here that keeps this movie entertaining without going too far over into the deaths feeling meaningless and just silly.

Great use of "Sweet Jane."

The mythology of everything was starting to feel a little awkward but then that ending hits and 1666 gets teased and, dang, I felt a rush for how this story could get finished and brought together. There's something kinda cool and ambitious about what they tried to do with this trilogy and it feels like they just might be able to follow through. But we'll see.
the empire never ended
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#56
Watched 94 today. I have no idea what people were raving about. It's neither funny and witty like Scream nor nasty like Halloween. Most of what it adds to the genre is a modern form of faux-sincerity, which felt very CW to me and constantly entailed characters speaking their feelings out loud.
I might have been born yesterday sir, but I stayed up all night!
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#57
I think all of us knew what was going to happen to Alice in Fear 78. Especially when she started to give that long speech.
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#58
I was thinking to myself, "This is the Samuel L. Jackson in DEEP BLUE SEA moment."
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#59
Exactly! A pity. I liked her. Better than Deena and Sam in 94 at least.
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#60
1994: I wasn't impressed. Right off the bat the opening scene was a lame rip off of the beginning of Scream. I didn't like Deena. I think Sam would be better off without someone who got her into a car crash. While there were good songs used for the needle drops, I still felt like I was being hit over the head with them. After watching it I appreciate Stranger Things even more. That show isn't just coasting on nostalgia, it has a good story with a likable cast. I will say this for 1994, Kate's death was pretty fucking rad!

1978: Even though it was 2 am, I wasn't tired, so I gave this a chance and I'm glad I did. While I am a big fan of Scream and The Final Girls, I was glad this wasn't a meta take on slashers. It was a straight up crazy horror flick. Cindy's death was disturbing and not just because it was brutal. She had an arc where she had become comfortable in her own skin and made amends with her sister; however all of that growth was meaningless.
I've got good news and I've got bad news. The bad news is I've lost my way. The good news is I'm way ahead of schedule!
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#61
(07-10-2021, 11:22 PM)Chaz Rock City Wrote: While I am a big fan of Scream and The Final Girls, I was glad this wasn't a meta take on slashers.

I agree. They didn't get too cute with it.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#62
Watched both this weekend. Pretty fun, if inessential. I can think of lots of stuff I'd be less into than modest yet gory slasher films getting deposited on Netflix with a decent production sheen on them. Keep the Fear Street branding too, that makes it more fun.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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#63
Just finished 1978 and I enjoyed it just as much as I did 1994. Getting a trilogy of surprisingly solid supernatural slasher films like this for the summer is pretty damn awesome. Bring on 1666!
Originally Posted by ImmortanNick 

Saw Batman v Superman.
Now I know what it's like to see Nickelback in concert.

That's my review.
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#64
With 1978 I'm just somewhat confused as to what this whole thing is even meant to be. '78 in particular seems to be built as the ultimate slasher film, but it just kind of falls flat in that regard. I'm not even sure why this movie goes with killing off the campers when it doesn't actually go for it and show it at all. Either kill the campers and show it, or just kill off counselors so it can be shown; this middle ground thing of doing it without doing it isn't the crazy thing I think this movie thinks it's doing. While watching this one, at a certain point, I just was kind of thinking of last years Netflix original slasher Nobody Sleeps in the Woods Tonight; that seems to be what this wishes it was...a big crazy mix of a bunch of horror stuff working in the mold of an '80s slasher. If you having seen Nobody Sleeps in the Woods Tonight, watch Nobody Sleeps in the Woods Tonight.

The dates picked are also kind of weird. This seems to be called '78 because of Halloween, but then it's really nothing to do with Halloween and everything to do with the 1980 Friday the 13th. Likewise you've got 1994. Now the movie itself seems to mostly be playing off Scream (1996) and those late '90s Kevin Williamson slasher films and stuff like it; but it's not '96, it's '94 for some reason. What reason? I don't know. New Nightmare, In the Mouth of Madness, Night of the Demons 2? As weird as I find the dates, it is whoever kind of funny that both just need to be pushed up two years.

This one (1978) has more likeable characters than the first at least. Given this wrong side of the tracks thing (which is heightened to an absurd cartoonish degree) being a major throughline it is going to be funny to see how that works into the 1666 setting.

(07-10-2021, 12:15 PM)Belloq87 Wrote: I thought the movie clearly wanted us to think Jacobs was the older sister, and it came across as so obvious that I expected the reveal to ultimately end up being what it was.

I don't think it fully works in-universe, as the 1994 kids react in shock at the end of Jacobs telling the story... but how could Jacobs have maintained that surprise until the end of her telling?  One of them says, "Wait, you're Ziggy?"  So was Jacobs telling the story entirely in the third person?  That's the only way I could see how she'd avoid making it clear right away which sister she really was.

But I get it, it's a "movie reveal" thing that we just shouldn't think too hard about.

I thought it was so clear it was the younger sister thoughout the whole movie I wasn't even aware the movie was trying to play this aspect as a mystery. In fact when they did, for a moment, I thought the movie was doing some Freaky Friday body swap thing where the sisters (I also had forgotten the characters names by this point) had switched places.

The movie as a story being told by Ziggy totally doesn't even kind of work in-universe. It so doesn't work it almost seems like a joke when it's revealed what we're watching is meant to be a story being told as opposed to the movie flashing back to the events from that time. There's just too much Ziggy knows that she shouldn't know. Actually thinking about it now, given the kind of meta nature of the whole thing I'm a little surprised they didn't have the '90s characters walking around in the '70s stuff like an Annie Hall flashback if for no other reason than to keep those '90s characters in the mix; doing that would have also been funny given where 1666 seems to be going.
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#65
I really enjoyed 1978, way more than 94. Granted there wasn't a devastating kill like the bread slicer but at least the axe hacks were pretty gruesome. 

I mistakingly looked up the credits for this while watching so I was spoiled which sister was which. Even so when the big sister died it was still super affective. I liked her way more than the lead in 94.

The needle drops really don't bother me at all. I just like hearing some good tunes. 

Looking forward to see how this ends.
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#66
The needle drops in 1978 didn't seem nearly as overbearing to me as in 1994.

Probably because I like '70s music more than '90s music (to grossly over-generalize).
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#67
Iam exactly the audience radio stations go for. Im top 40 all the way, doesn't matter what genre (pop, rock, rap, disco, dance, country). So when I hear songs i know and like, Im your huckleberry.
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#68
Very curious what the needle drops in 1666 will be. Vivaldi? Handel? Or regional selections?

Maybe the Sunnyvalers listen to the Europeans, and the Shadysiders are all into colonial drum and fife.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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#69
I'm genuinely interested to hear what Beltrami's score for 1666 will sound like. 1994 and 1978 had him working in very different modes, so what next? Some THE WITCH influence, perhaps?
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#70
Would be funny if it was something like the crazy jazz soundtrack they put on that version of Häxan with William S Burroughs.
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