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The Chud Beer Drinkers Thread
#71

When my buddy completed his 10th trip through, the Saucer made a special plate for him and put it up over the bar by itself.

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#72


Quote:
Originally Posted by kernel View Post

When my buddy completed his 10th trip through, the Saucer made a special plate for him and put it up over the bar by itself.



Now that is a feat of awesomeness.

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#73

Found the Duchesse this afternoon at my local Total Wine.  It's in the fridge waiting to be enjoyed tonight.

Also picked up a Delirium Nocturnum to see if it is better than the Tremens.  And paused in front of the Three Philosophers but couldn't recall if it was one of the recommended ones from the thread.

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#74

Dipped my toe into the Pumpkins already, though it is stupid early, I know. Weyerbacher's Imperial Pumpkin is the early leader in the clubhouse thus far over Dogfish Head and Smuttynose. Many more to follow.

Also, next week I will find myself in Canada for a few days which will probably result in Trois Pistoles and  La Fin Du Monde making up about 65% of my bloodstream by the time I drop back down north of the border.

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#75


Quote:
Originally Posted by TzuDohNihm View Post

Found the Duchesse this afternoon at my local Total Wine.  It's in the fridge waiting to be enjoyed tonight.

Also picked up a Delirium Nocturnum to see if it is better than the Tremens.  And paused in front of the Three Philosophers but couldn't recall if it was one of the recommended ones from the thread.


Three Philosophers is one of the BEST you can find. Go back and buy it. You wont regret it.

Not a big fan of pumpkin ales myself. Recently went to an Abita tasting here in Asheville and they had their Pecan Harvest Ale. Deliciousness, and definitely is taking the place of the pumpkin ales for me.

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#76

Mock the Bud Lite drinkers all you want, but leave Yuengling out of it! They make perfectly tasty session beers -- know how you can tell? they still taste fine at proper temperatures -- and make them without shortcuts or adjuncts, and are still independently owned. If you don't like their lager, try their black and tan, or other styles. Your tennis pal may be an asshole for other reasons, but not his beer choice (til he orders the round of Bud Lite).

As for temperature, "ice cold beer" is a marketing invention by the mega-breweries dating back to late 19th century. Simple reasoning: If something is ice cold, you can't taste it. Simple experiment: Place a pea on your tongue, cooked or raw. Tastes like a pea. Put a frozen pea on your tongue. Has no taste; the extremely low temperature literally numbs and neutralizes the taste buds. Even in America, when signs started showing up pitching "Ice Cold Beer Here!" folks were all head-scratching and huh? But the crappy tasting beer was sold very, very cheaply and marketed toward the laboring class and poor. And already back then the mega-breweries were large enough to control the message, and not only dictate that "ice cold" was proper beer temperature, but that those fags in Europe drink theirs warm. Warm beer!? What assholes!

Heck, here's some deeper history, cause I have time to kill. Until the mid- to late-19 century, there weren't any beers lighter in color or strength than the dense near-orange of pale ales. Lagering -- using lager (bottom-fermenting) yeasts that survive and floculate at lower temperatures -- had been around since the Middle Ages, although no one really understood the process (microbes? yeast?). Then an innovator brought the pale ale style to a lagering brewery, and among other good stuff produced for the first time a pale-yellow, straw-colored beer. A few styles arose from this method (including some dark), and the lightest was dubbed a pilsener, after the Czech town Plzen, which claims the first modern pilsener brewed. The pilsener was huge, and not just as a hell of a novelty. It was such a precious, fascinating innovation that it was the beer of choice for the German and Czech peerage back when royalty still set the style of the day. Hence, one of those original breweries, Budweiser Budvar, sold itself as "The Beer of Kings." They began exporting to the U.S. in 1871.

In 1876, Anheuser-Busch began producing a pale yellow beer, used the brand "Budweiser," sold it cheap to the common man, and dubbed it "The King of Beers." Yup!

Except Anheuser-Busch didn't quite replicate the recipe. Whereas Budvar (and the European pilsener brewers) pulled off their light yellow lagers using all barley, A-B cut corners to save costs, and began using rice as an adjunct. In beer, barley malt produces the fermentable sugars that convert into alcohol, but not all sugars are fermented in the process, imparting a sweetness to beer (that hops are used to balance) as well as proteins and other flavor characters (and the malting process introduces the caramelization that darkens beer, which is why keeping pilseners light-colored yet alcoholic was such a breakthrough). Rice, however, could provide the fermentable sugars at an order of magnitude cheaper than barley, without its malting process darkening the beer -- or adding any of those other delicious things. In fact, malted rice with barley malt and hops can be not so tasty. Try a cheap-sake-and-Boddington's boilermaker sometime. At least they're not coy about it. Next time you find a can of plain old Budweiser in your hand, note the fancy script declaring the "Choicest Hops, Rice and Best Barley Malt."

So, A-B produced a very, very low-cost version of the Beer Du Jour, baldly stealing the name of one of its innovators. Too bad it tasted like crap when served as every other beer in the world prior had been served. But they had the money to make it a loss-leader for a time to flood the market with their product and an ICE COLD BEER! advertising campaign that'd make Don Draper faint. It's possibly the single most pervasive and successful re-defining of a product in marketing history.

So, the frozen pea analogy. The reason an "ice cold Bud" is so refreshing on a blistering hot summer day is because you're enjoying the water, which is what all beer mostly is, anyway. The fizz reminds you it's not just water, but any other flavor is largely nullified by the low temp numbing the taste buds. Then, the longer you take to drink it, the worse it begins to taste. Too many Americans attribute this to taking too long to drink the beer, and it losing the proper beer temperature. The power of more than a century of marketing propaganda. In actuality, it is because they are actually tasting the beer.

Now as I'm sure any Euro Chewers can attest, no one likes warm beer, in the world. Everyone enjoys cool beer. Cellar temp, ideally.  In your home, if you don't have a cool dry cellar then the best place to keep your beer is in the fridge door, which is the warmest part of the refrigerator. If someone left behind after a football game a sixer of Coors with the "Very Cold!" color-changing label, leave it in the back as close to the freezer as possible, and save em for boilermakers at the next game.

I hope I don't sound like I was picking on you, Tzu, temp's just one of those topics I always end up Holding Forth on in a righteous and obnoxious manner. It's even more boring in person. As for beers that are owning me lately, I can't leave the nearby Belgian spot (this place is Belgain beer heaven) without finishing with a draft Kasteel Rouge when they have it. I have friends that find its sour cherry notes too heavy -- hot pink head! -- but I sink into it like a beer sundae.

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#77

Quote:
Originally Posted by Trav McGee
Mock the Bud Lite drinkers all you want, but leave Yuengling out of it! They make perfectly tasty session beers -- know how you can tell? they still taste fine at proper temperatures -- and make them without shortcuts or adjuncts, and are still independently owned. If you don't like their lager, try their black and tan, or other styles. Your tennis pal may be an asshole for other reasons, but not his beer choice (til he orders the round of Bud Lite).

Z

Damnit.  I knew some asshole would do it.  Smile

Just picking right back at ya Trav, but my two experiences with Yuengling are identical and were it only one time I would have written the beer off as skunked but trying basic Yuengling on two separate nights both gave me a raw sewage flavor if I recall correctly since it has been over three years I would wager since I sampled it.  This was back when it was storming the beer aisles around these parts.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Trav McGee View Post

As for temperature, "ice cold beer" is a marketing invention by the mega-breweries dating back to late 19th century. Simple reasoning: If something is ice cold, you can't taste it. Simple experiment: Place a pea on your tongue, cooked or raw. Tastes like a pea. Put a frozen pea on your tongue. Has no taste; the extremely low temperature literally numbs and neutralizes the taste buds. Even in America, when signs started showing up pitching "Ice Cold Beer Here!" folks were all head-scratching and huh? But the crappy tasting beer was sold very, very cheaply and marketed toward the laboring class and poor. And already back then the mega-breweries were large enough to control the message, and not only dictate that "ice cold" was proper beer temperature, but that those fags in Europe drink theirs warm. Warm beer!? What assholes!

Heck, here's some deeper history, cause I have time to kill. Until the mid- to late-19 century, there weren't any beers lighter in color or strength than the dense near-orange of pale ales. Lagering -- using lager (bottom-fermenting) yeasts that survive and floculate at lower temperatures -- had been around since the Middle Ages, although no one really understood the process (microbes? yeast?). Then an innovator brought the pale ale style to a lagering brewery, and among other good stuff produced for the first time a pale-yellow, straw-colored beer. A few styles arose from this method (including some dark), and the lightest was dubbed a pilsener, after the Czech town Plzen, which claims the first modern pilsener brewed. The pilsener was huge, and not just as a hell of a novelty. It was such a precious, fascinating innovation that it was the beer of choice for the German and Czech peerage back when royalty still set the style of the day. Hence, one of those original breweries, Budweiser Budvar, sold itself as "The Beer of Kings." They began exporting to the U.S. in 1871.

In 1876, Anheuser-Busch began producing a pale yellow beer, used the brand "Budweiser," sold it cheap to the common man, and dubbed it "The King of Beers." Yup!

Except Anheuser-Busch didn't quite replicate the recipe. Whereas Budvar (and the European pilsener brewers) pulled off their light yellow lagers using all barley, A-B cut corners to save costs, and began using rice as an adjunct. In beer, barley malt produces the fermentable sugars that convert into alcohol, but not all sugars are fermented in the process, imparting a sweetness to beer (that hops are used to balance) as well as proteins and other flavor characters (and the malting process introduces the caramelization that darkens beer, which is why keeping pilseners light-colored yet alcoholic was such a breakthrough). Rice, however, could provide the fermentable sugars at an order of magnitude cheaper than barley, without its malting process darkening the beer -- or adding any of those other delicious things. In fact, malted rice with barley malt and hops can be not so tasty. Try a cheap-sake-and-Boddington's boilermaker sometime. At least they're not coy about it. Next time you find a can of plain old Budweiser in your hand, note the fancy script declaring the "Choicest Hops, Rice and Best Barley Malt."

So, A-B produced a very, very low-cost version of the Beer Du Jour, baldly stealing the name of one of its innovators. Too bad it tasted like crap when served as every other beer in the world prior had been served. But they had the money to make it a loss-leader for a time to flood the market with their product and an ICE COLD BEER! advertising campaign that'd make Don Draper faint. It's possibly the single most pervasive and successful re-defining of a product in marketing history.

So, the frozen pea analogy. The reason an "ice cold Bud" is so refreshing on a blistering hot summer day is because you're enjoying the water, which is what all beer mostly is, anyway. The fizz reminds you it's not just water, but any other flavor is largely nullified by the low temp numbing the taste buds. Then, the longer you take to drink it, the worse it begins to taste. Too many Americans attribute this to taking too long to drink the beer, and it losing the proper beer temperature. The power of more than a century of marketing propaganda. In actuality, it is because they are actually tasting the beer.

Now as I'm sure any Euro Chewers can attest, no one likes warm beer, in the world. Everyone enjoys cool beer. Cellar temp, ideally.  In your home, if you don't have a cool dry cellar then the best place to keep your beer is in the fridge door, which is the warmest part of the refrigerator. If someone left behind after a football game a sixer of Coors with the "Very Cold!" color-changing label, leave it in the back as close to the freezer as possible, and save em for boilermakers at the next game.

I hope I don't sound like I was picking on you, Tzu, temp's just one of those topics I always end up Holding Forth on in a righteous and obnoxious manner. It's even more boring in person. As for beers that are owning me lately, I can't leave the nearby Belgian spot (this place is Belgain beer heaven) without finishing with a draft Kasteel Rouge when they have it. I have friends that find its sour cherry notes too heavy -- hot pink head! -- but I sink into it like a beer sundae.


I understood the cold numbing properties but didn't know some of the marketing history, thanks, that was a good read.

Seems to me the craft beer craze could benefit from someone modifying a wine cellar to accommodate beer bottles and begin selling them so that precises temperature control can be maintained vs. refrigerators.

*EDIT*  I picked up the Three Philosophers this afternoon along with a Chimay White and Red, only ever tried the Blue.  Also picked up a harvest from Abita Springs, Satsuma Harvest Wit.  Rounding out the pick six was a Duck Rabbit Pale, if anyone has any thoughts on the DR brewery i would appreciate them as I have often overlooked them but have been meaning to give them a go.  I also managed to get a growler of the latest Dank Tank from Sweetwater, Mean Joe Bean, an Imperial Stout.

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#78

Mr. McGee, you don't know it but I'm applauding. I laugh heartily whenever people on the far side of the Atlantic mock someone for not freezing their beer.

And Tzu. Enjoy that Red Chimay. The Premiere is one of my all time favorites.

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#79

Went through the Dank Tank: Mean Joe Bean, Abita and Red Chimay last night.  Was not impressed with any of them.

The Abita was flavorless and over carbonated, the yeast of the Red was quite overpowering and the Bean, while good for a stout, was way too bitter on the aftertaste.  As someone who likes IPAs I believe the extreme bitterness must have come from the coffee and I am in no way a coffee drinker.

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#80

Oh wow. I guess if yeast bothers you the Premiere wouldn't be such a good choice. It's a shame though. Hearing a beer lover not enjoying it is akin to hearing someone not liking blowjobs for me. Shame.

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#81

HA!  Normally yeast isn't a problem.  I usually like a good wheat beer and don't mind a little sediment in my beer but the aftertaste was thicker than the initial swig and just made me feel like I was swallowing a loaf of bread after every sip.

Where does the White Fall in respect to the Blue and Red?

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#82

If you didn't like the red I'd guess the blue would be more to your liking. The white would be too 'bready' for you.

A word of warning though, I'm a bit of a fanboy of the style. If I could only drink Chimay and Duvel for the rest of my life I'd be OK.

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#83

I loved the Blue when I first tried it a year ago.  Quite like drinking a nice champagne.  The Duvel was on the shelf next to the Chimay's but I passed it up.

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#84

I have to stop thinking that I can't be surprised anymore.

el+mole+ocho.png

Thought it might be a novelty, but the smoke and cocoa and chilis and coffee... Somehow it comes together to make an amazing brew. As it says on the label, pair with red meat or dark chocolate.

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#85

So there's a rumor going around that New Belgium is going to be building their east coast operations in Asheville. I, along with most of the local beer people fucking hate this idea. I feel that New Belgium being here will overpower the smaller craft breweries we have here. Everything will be New Belgium sponsored if this happens. Though I love their beer immensely, I dont feel like Asheville is a good place for them.

Tonight I had something quite awesome and quite special on draught at the Universal Joint tonight. Sierra Nevada and Dogfish Head came together to create the Life and Limb American Strong Ale. Holy crap this was DELICIOUS. It's pretty rare and somewhat hard to find...but if you see it...BUY IT!

http://beeradvocate.com/beer/profile/140/54089

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#86

Could anything better have happened to the world of beer?

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#87

Bud Light Lime? I hope all of it gets ruined.

Bud Light Lime? I didn't know this thing even existed. Probably tastes worse than Satan's piss.

Bud Light Lime. Artificially flavored light Bud. Jeez.

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#88

The stuff is huge here and not just with women.

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#89


Quote:
Originally Posted by stelios View Post

Bud Light Lime? I hope all of it gets ruined.


Isn't it already ruined just simply by being Bud Light Lime?

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#90

My friend was waiting tables at the Saucer in Memphis and a guy comes in,

"Do you have Bud Light Lime?"

"Sorry, no."

"Do have anything like that?"

"We have Bud Light.  And limes."

He turned around and left.

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#91


Quote:
Originally Posted by kernel View Post

My friend was waiting tables at the Saucer in Memphis and a guy comes in,

"Do you have Bud Light Lime?"

"Sorry, no."

"Do have anything like that?"

"We have Bud Light.  And limes."

He turned around and left.


Wow. That dumb fuck is almost worthy of admiration. Man loves his Bud Lime and damn your establishment if you don't serve it!

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#92

Funnily enough, my restaurant beer conversations go almost exactly opposite of that.

"Do you have..." and then I proceed to go through the most commercially acceptable good beers I can think of until finally settling on something less than stellar or moving on to gin.  Luckily around here Sweetwater 420 is being stocked on tap more and more. It has replaced Rogue's Dead Guy as the "craft" beer of choice for taps in a landscape of corporate swill.

If you absolutely must drink beer when out go for a Corona and forgo the lime while asking for a chilled shot of Bacardi Limon.  Drink the swallow from the neck and pour in the shot.  Mix as you would the lime and enjoy.

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#93

Yeah, Bud Light Lime is an evil concoction created for people who dont know what beer is.

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#94
AI love a good beer, but I don't get too snobbish about it. I could barely finish a bottle of Bud light lime. Shit is terrible.
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#95

It's like this thing was made expressly for me to sneer at. No wonder people call me an alcohol snob.

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#96


Quote:
Originally Posted by James May View Post

I love a good beer, but I don't get too snobbish about it.


Fuck that, I wear my snobbery like a badge of honor.

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#97


Quote:
Originally Posted by hexx462 View Post





Fuck that, I wear my snobbery like a badge of honor.



Aye, me too.

In beer news/upcoming events:

This weekend Asheville hosts one of the most awesome (and hardest to get a ticket for) beer festival...Brewgrass Festival. It's exactly what it sounds like...beer and bluegrass. For the first time ever I was able to get a ticket this year without having to scalp one at the gate.

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#98

This had promise, a few nights ago:

3136597524_3520df6222.jpg

Taking a look at the picture above as well as reviews all over the web and similar to the cold/warm discussion earlier I hereby put out a new topic, head.  My father was a Captain in the Marine Corps and would throw parties a few times a year for his command.  I would man the keg, Miller Lite without fail, with a tip cup and was taught how to pour a perfect beer without any foam.  This thought process and imagery carried over into restaurants where bartenders would make sure to serve as little foam as possible on tap beers.

Fast forward to these past five-ten years and reading beer reviews and watching the craft beer scene blossom there is always mention of the head and some beer of needing a head to enjoy properly.

What say you BrewChewers, head or no head?

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#99

For me? Head. The proper amount mind you. Even besides the fact that its aroma becomes more evident, something needed because the circumstances aren't always optimal or the fact that I think it looks better, I love the ritual. Having a nice hefeweiss, pouring it just right, stirring the rest to make the head and then pouring it in the glass. And then the aroma hitting you as you raise the glass to your mouth, followed by this cool, light, velvety sensation on your lips just before the beer comes. Love it.

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Hefe's need that last little bit of course but does every beer?  Wine snobs in the past few years I have noticed getting on the venturi stopper kick to aerate their vino as they pour.  Does every beer deserve aeration?  Do some beers benefit and/or degrade with a loss of some carbonation?

As I think I mentioned above the Abita Springs Harvest I had was wayyyy too fizzy but I did manage only a slight head as I am having to learn to pour beers again because I always go for an extreme angle of the glass and a soft roll of the liquid on the bottom so as to not disturb the carbonation.

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What I described about the extra sensory experience that head adds works for all other types of beer too. For me at least.

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I like a little head with my beer. Just the right amount will make the aroma that much more noticeable (a good thing to me)

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DJ,

Did you hit that festival over the weekend?  How was it?

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Yup. I was definitely there! It was perfectly awesome. Brewgrass Festival really is a must-attend. Some great local and regional breweries, and then some big name craft breweries from around the country were there showing off their wares. I actually kept a list of every beer I tasted and could post that if people are curious about who/what was there.

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That's what the thread is for, yeah?  " rel="http://files.chud.com/images/smilies/wink.gif">

" rel="http://files.chud.com/images/smilies/wink.gif">Also,  I tried the Chimay White and the Three Philosophers last night.  Both very fine beers that I will heartily try again and recommend.

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