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Costco apologizes for labeling bibles as fiction
Quote:
Originally Posted by Aurora Vampiris View Post
 


Ouch.



On that note, I wonder if there are religions where the world is created, but has no conceivable end. All religions seem to believe that what is created has to end - something that I think stems from birth and death. We were created, and we end. Therefore, if the world is created, it must end. There's a big disconnect in there, in any case, even if one believes the world is created.



Christian Science has no particular eschatology like that.  But then ultimately they don't think the 'physical plane', as such, is real  (not that they'd call it the physical plane).



Also: this thread has everything!

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I actually like Christian mythology a lot*, and was raised Catholic for the record. And attended a Catholic high school so I am reasonably well versed In the Catholic interpretation of the Bible.  Had a Religion class for 4 years in high school.  Currently transitioning from agnostic to atheist.



* Which the Constantine film is wonderful at


I saw Jay Leno driving an antique convertible through Malibu Canyon.  Doin' the werewolves of London.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rylander View Post
 

I actually like Christian mythology a lot*, and was raised Catholic for the record. And attended a Catholic high school so I am reasonably well versed In the Catholic interpretation of the Bible.  Had a Religion class for 4 years in high school.  Currently transitioning from agnostic to atheist.



* Which the Constantine film is wonderful at




Question...in your H.S> religion class, were other religions discussed objectively or was it more of a "here are those other religions but the Catholics are the one's that got it right" attitude?



I ask because I had a college humanities Prof. who was an ex-Catholic priest.  He grew up in a religious home and that was the profession he was going to pursue. He studied at the Vatican, spoke Italian and some Latin....pretty deeply ensconced in the faith.


After 20 odd years, he eventually became really disillusioned with how ass-backards the church was when it comes to social matters (no birth control, divorce=bad, etc) and he didn't see them wanting to 'move the church into the modern world'.



My point is that in order to get to the level that  he was in the church, one had to be pretty well educated. And one aspect was being knowledgeable about the other religions of the world. One time I asked him how, after studying all the other religions/myths from around the world, he could still remain a priest.  He said that his skepticism started to come to the forefront when he started studying other religions and was exposed to the alternatives early in his college career.  He stuck with the church because that was what one did when he was growing up. (1930's, 40's)



All that being said, I think a comparative religion course should be taught in H.S., maybe earlier although I hesitate to imagine how batshit nuts fundamentalist parents in TX, AL, etc. would get if their children were to be taught about Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, Hinduism, et al.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by VTRan View Post
 


Question...in your H.S> religion class, were other religions discussed objectively or was it more of a "here are those other religions but the Catholics are the one's that got it right" attitude?



Oh, no.  Since 99% of us students were Catholic, those other religions weren't acknowledged much beyond the obvious Judaism.  Since it was a Catholic school the part about being right was presumed. But there was not much discussion of why others were wrong.  Plenty of pro-life stuff though.

I saw Jay Leno driving an antique convertible through Malibu Canyon.  Doin' the werewolves of London.
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Quote:

Originally Posted by VTRan View Post
 

 

All that being said, I think a comparative religion course should be taught in H.S., maybe earlier although I hesitate to imagine how batshit nuts fundamentalist parents in TX, AL, etc. would get if their children were to be taught about Islam, Judaism, Sikhism, Hinduism, et al.



Mask it as a "Know thine enemy" course, and they'd be all for it!



Hindus are fucking hilarious, they've got about a billion gods so they don't really develop a "mine is right" approach to their religion. I got a Hindu girl to write me down her favourite Gods once, I had to stop her when she got to Jesus.



"Hold on, did you just say Jesus?"


"Yes"


"How is Jesus on your list?"


"I like Jesus!"



When you believe in reincarnation, even for your Gods, you can just grab everything.

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glisten View Post
 


Mask it as a "Know thine enemy" course, and they'd be all for it!



Hindus are fucking hilarious, they've got about a billion gods so they don't really develop a "mine is right" approach to their religion. I got a Hindu girl to write me down her favourite Gods once, I had to stop her when she got to Jesus.



"Hold on, did you just say Jesus?"


"Yes"


"How is Jesus on your list?"


"I like Jesus!"



When you believe in reincarnation, even for your Gods, you can just grab everything.



To be fair, that's primarily because the Hindus don't really have a single primary scripture, so to speak. Even the core texts that most Hindus claim as their central scripture - the Vedas - were written at different points in time. Similarly, while one of their epics - the Ramayana - was written by a certain Valmiki, the other epic - the Mahabharata - was written by Vyasa. The infamous Kamasutra by Vatsyayana (that every Indian never reads, but loves talking about). Their mathematics treatises by the likes of Bhaskara and Aryabhatta, economics by Chanakya, their social treatise by Manu and so on and so forth.



As such, there really is no ruling belief in Hinduism - you get the likes of the Arya Samaj preaching pantheism, the Brahmo Samaj preaching a single God, ISKCON advocating the presence of a primary deity that rules over other lesser gods and so on and so forth. And then you get the Advaita and Carvak believers that are actually atheists. And of course, like the Hindu girl Glisten mentioned... the polytheists.



So... yeah. It's really really hard to pin down a central authority for most Hindus (not to mention the fact that most Hindus haven't even read most of these discrete scriptures) - however, when pushed, I suppose most Hindus will claim allegiance to the Bhagavad Gita.



There you go - crash course in Hinduism, so you don't think of them as a bunch of unprincipled, but hilarious, and exotic, barbarians.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Aurora Vampiris View Post
 




There you go - crash course in Hinduism, so you don't think of them as a bunch of unprincipled, but hilarious, and exotic, barbarians.



Nah, that's the Sikhs Smile

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Glisten View Post
 


Nah, that's the Sikhs Smile



Don't make me hit you with a silver bangle! <img src=" src="http://files.chud.com/images/smilies/biggrin.gif" />

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AThe people of York have a very dry sense of humour, which they're clearly putting to good use to advertise one of the town's main tourist attractions. Saying that though, Ragnarok is certainly one version of the end times that sounds like it might work out okay for us.
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