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Starry Eyes discussion
#1

A horror film my producer was involved with is dropping Nov. 14th on VOD and a limited theatrical run...it's been getting rave reviews across the board and is tearing up the festival circuit.  I'd appreciate the support from the chud community for a film like this.  It also has a great throwback 80s horror synth score (by Jonathan Snipes, who also scored The Shining documentary 'Room 237').   Thanks.



http://deadline.com/2014/10/starry-eyes-...201268234/



http://www.shocktillyoudrop.com/news/363...ack-vinyl/

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#2
ALooks good!
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#3

At first I thought "That Tim Burton painting movie?"  Then I was all like "watching the trailer", THEN I was all like "Hey that looks pretty neato!"



Now I'm all like going to go masturbate.

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#4
AWhere did I just read something about this? I feel as if I cracked open a Fangoria in the past 24-48 hrs and perused an article.
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#5

I had the exact same damn feeling.  I think it was a BAD article?



Yup.  It looks like He Who Shall Not Be Named and Merideth both ran reviews of it individually.

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#6
AI'm looking forward to it.
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#7

I should pick this for a weekly Movie Night I do with my friends.  Sounds like a good one to react to and talk about afterwards.

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#8

So this comes out today streaming on various outlets (amazon, vudu, google, etc)...with a limited theatrical.  More info here.



The lead actress was just on Carson Daly, and her breakout performance has been the most talked about aspect of the film.



Devin reviewed the film back in October, which feels oddly appropriate to mention.



I'd be interested in hearing feedback about the film from the community, and obviously want your support...the film I'm currently working on with one of the producers has a similar Cronenbergian/Lynch vibe that the filmmakers were going for here, but in my film it's much more psychological and there is a sci-fi element as a spring board.  Hopefully by this time next year (or sooner) I'll be able to post a thread for it here.  It's called Dream Machine FYI.



Pretty cool alternate poster:



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#9
AI'm definitely going to probably see it this weekend.
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#10

Looking forward to it!

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#11

Having just seen the film myself, I was alot more affected by it than I thought I'd be.  It definitely captures the shallow, wide eyed naivete and desperation of the LA/Hollywood scene...and some of that stuff hits painfully close to home.



But it's a genre film, and you are really reminded of that in the bonkers 3rd act.  Horror (especially low budget horror) is kind of a joke these days, but this did it right.  It's very intense and Alex Essoe as the lead is a revelation.  She's so damn good I wouldn't be surprised if she becomes a star at some point in the future.  Without spoiling anything, I'd say the film achieves exactly what it sets out to do...like Cronenberg in his body horror days, where he took abstract concepts and made them physical, Starry Eyes takes the very cliched selling ones soul to be famous aspect of Hollywood and REALLY makes it physical.

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#12

Horror’s Most Fearless Performance of the Year Is Just Carrying on Tradition (Contains SPOILERS)

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#13
AIt's pretty great. Should be required viewing for every aspiring actress.
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#14

Thanks for the support!

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#15

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/starry-eyes-2014

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#16
Quote:

Originally Posted by Ambler View Post
 

http://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/starry-eyes-2014


Wait Roger Ebert reviewed this? This MUST be good!

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#17
Quote:
Originally Posted by Waaaaaaaalt View Post
 

Wait Roger Ebert reviewed this?



Befitting of the genre Wink

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#18

I've been turning this movie over in my head all day. The more I think about it, the more I like it.



What fascinates me is that, in my reading of it anyway, she wins at the end. She gives up her last shred of personal integrity, completely deteriorates physically and psychologically, betrays all of her friends, and is reborn as the ideal that she's created for herself -- she's now a "star" that would fit in alongside all of the famous faces in her wall mural.

What a horror movie.
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#19

It's definitely a genre movie that has that special, intangible "something" that elevates it above the usual pap, which is why I'm promoting it so hard...at first it was out of loyalty to friends, now, having seen it...it's out of wanting good cinema to be seen.



I think what makes it hit home so hard is that it taps into that secret, primal desire for everyone to know our name and love us, and twists it like a knife.  Because deep down we all know what Hollywood is...a metaphorical blood bank for the rich and famous, who feed off the young and naive who arrive looking for stardom, who in turn also become vampires...the film just takes that basic conceit and...


makes it literal. 


In a way, it reminded me of Aronofsky's slow burn meltdown approach he takes in his films.  This has alot in common with Black Swan, but I felt moreso echoes of the 3rd act of Requiem, another film which has a bonkers 3rd act that takes the film to a ridiculously over the top, but nonetheless effective conclusion to become a cautionary tale about living in the lala-land of drugs.  In this case, the drug is stardom, and the tragedy is, the main character...


literally loses her humanity and becomes the drug incarnate.  
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#20

I should modify what I said about Hollywood...it's not all a hive of scum and villainy, there are some really wonderful, amazing, talented, good people there...but there is a lot of sleaze, and it's usually at the outer edges, which makes it more dangerous for novices trying to get in.

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#21

The lead in this is REALLY great.  Just a strong supporting cast all the way through.



Not being much of a horror guy, I was a TAD disappointed with the way this concluded despite the fact it is quite clearly doing what it set out to do very well.  I did prefer the more Lynchian setup (along with the very heightened, yet relatable, emotions that Sarah goes through in making her decisions) as opposed to the more genre conclusion.



This is one of the aspects I really dug about the film (from the Ebert.com review):



Quote:

 But wait, there's more: Widmeyer and Kolsch make matters much worse for Sarah by revealing that the people who held her back earlier also happen to be human beings. That's not a spoiler: Sarah's world just expands in such a way that you can eventually see the film's obnoxious supporting characters as more than one-note bullies. Take for example Carl (Pat Healy), Sarah's boss at her diner day job. Like many of the characters Healy plays, Carl is a nervous wreck who tries and fails to hide his insecurity by acting blustery and cruel. He ogles Sarah early on, but he also shows concern for her when she starts to fall apart. Carl is not a mentor figure, and is definitely not a good guy. But he's also not just out to get Sarah, as she wrongfully assumes. The same is true of Sarah's catty friends, who show real concern for her, even if that concern is of the ew-get-it-out-of-my-face variety. 
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#22
AI loved the scene where Pat Healy's eating his lunch while she's begging for her job back. It's as routine for him to hear struggling actresses' apologizing for quitting as it is to have fast food out of a container at his desk.
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#23
AGood old Pat Healy. Slow burning his way into my heart.
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#24
Quote:
Originally Posted by Bradito View Post

I loved the scene where Pat Healy's eating his lunch while she's begging for her job back. It's as routine for him to hear struggling actresses' apologizing for quitting as it is to have fast food out of a container at his desk.


Like I said, the film does a great job of capturing the essence of that city.  If you've spent a good length of time there, you know exactly what Healy is talking about and even sympathize with him.

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#25
AI've lived in L.A. for 12 years now. Fortunately I gave up on acting while I was still in college. But I've known my share of future washed-up actors.
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#26

One of my best friends is a washed up never-has-been actor/musician.  When the acting didn't work in LA, he went to NY to pursue music...when that failed, he moved to Austin, where we met up again last year...now he works as a sort of telemarketer who obviously hates it, and every time we hang out it's "I really believe I would've made a heck of an actor"...it's really sad to watch.  I think he would have too, but IMO he never put enough effort into it.   I don't think there's anything worse than having artistic aspirations and not being able to fulfill them...you go through life depressed, bitter and resentful unless you can find another purpose.

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#27
AI think it's probably a good thing that I failed at every creative endeavor I embarked upon in my 20s. I learned not to do things out of desperation. And that I'm only marginally talented.

Important things to know!
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#28
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ambler View Post
 

One of my best friends is a washed up never-has-been actor/musician.  When the acting didn't work in LA, he went to NY to pursue music...when that failed, he moved to Austin, where we met up again last year...now he works as a sort of telemarketer who obviously hates it, and every time we hang out it's "I really believe I would've made a heck of an actor"...it's really sad to watch.  I think he would have too, but IMO he never put enough effort into it.   I don't think there's anything worse than having artistic aspirations and not being able to fulfill them...you go through life depressed, bitter and resentful unless you can find another purpose.


I don't know, I kinda envy people like this.  At least he's not giving up on his dreams.



Hell, I went to film school with crazy aspirations.  I became discourage and thank god my minor was computers.  It gave me a good life. but I continually wish I would have stuck it out more in Film.   Problem with the Arts is it really takes crazy luck to break in.

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#29

The odds are certainly the worst you can imagine.  And that's just breaking in and being low on the totem pole.  You really have to want it to survive.  Boot camp is the analogy I like to use.  It's a weeding out process.  But if you're genuinely talented and have the skills to back it up, you definitely wont be ignored.

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#30

Call to arms...the film is now #2 on iTunes and a #1 spot would be awesome for indie horror...please check this out if you haven't already.  It's a chud move through and through.  Thanks.

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#31
AWhat's number one?
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#32
APee.
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#33
Aohhhhhhh
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#34
Quote:
Originally Posted by mcnooj82 View Post

What's number one?

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#35

FUCK YOU, FRANCE!



I got your back Ambler!

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