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THE BALLAD OF BUSTER SCRUGGS Pre-Release Thread
#36
Between this, Welles' THE OTHER SIDE OF THE WIND, and OUTLAW KING, Netflix has got one hell of an early November slate.
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#37
Almost there...

[Image: tumblr_pey9rj9NYx1qbhgiho1_400.gif?w=605&ssl=1]
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#38
Nelson was just interviewed on Q about this and I’m fucking stoked.
“I feel a connection with you. A man connection. A mannection.”
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#39
Saw this at AFI Fest with the Coens and the cast and crew introducing.

Man, do not buy into any praise on this movie. It's awful. Like, I thought Hail, Caesar! was their Ghosts of Mars moment where they were just doing a greatest hits movie, but this... this is terrible.

The Coen Brothers have been near and dear to my heart for 20 years. Lebowski, No Country, Miller's Crossing... few directors have defined me as a person like the Coens. This movie left me equally pissed off and heartbroken. It's the first thing they've done that I've outright hated, a meandering, pointless collection of short stories with no connective tissue. A test of patience. The titular segment is really good, the rest cancels out every ounce of good will.

I can't remember the last time a director I loved let me down like this. Don't click the icon for this on Netflix, even if the reward is forgiveness of all your outstanding debt. It's horrible.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#40
Ouch!
If we can dream it, then we can do it.
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#41
(11-15-2018, 03:21 PM)huntertarantino Wrote: Saw this at AFI Fest with the Coens and the cast and crew introducing.

Man, do not buy into any praise on this movie. It's awful. Like, I thought Hail, Caesar! was their Ghosts of Mars moment where they were just doing a greatest hits movie, but this... this is terrible.

The Coen Brothers have been near and dear to my heart for 20 years. Lebowski, No Country, Miller's Crossing... few directors have defined me as a person like the Coens. This movie left me equally pissed off and heartbroken. It's the first thing they've done that I've outright hated, a meandering, pointless collection of short stories with no connective tissue. A test of patience. The titular segment is really good, the rest cancels out every ounce of good will.

I can't remember the last time a director I loved let me down like this. Don't click the icon for this on Netflix, even if the reward is forgiveness of all your outstanding debt. It's horrible.

Worse than Ladykillers?
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#42
I am watching this.
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#43
Cheers HT, low expectations are the best expectations.
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#44
(11-15-2018, 04:14 PM)Mangy Wrote: Worse than Ladykillers?

At least that had a cohesive narrative and Hanks going delightfully against type.

(11-15-2018, 04:57 PM)Bucho Wrote: Cheers HT, low expectations are the best expectations.

I had low expectations, too, as I haven't bought much into the Coens since True Grit.
"PREDATOR 2 feels like it was penned by convicts as part of a correctional facility's creative writing program, and that's what I love about it." - Moltisanti
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#45
(11-15-2018, 05:27 PM)huntertarantino Wrote: I had low expectations, too, as I haven't bought much into the Coens since True Grit.

Wait, you didn't like Llewyn Davis?

Ya suspect!
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#46
What kind of cohesive narrative do you look for in an anthology movie?
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#47
Should have stayed a miniseries. Are they still releasing that version of it?
the empire never ended
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#48
I thought the Coens denied it being intended for any other form than what it's being released in, and the TV show claim was the press misunderstanding the project in the first place.
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#49
Oh...

Bummer.
the empire never ended
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#50
(11-15-2018, 03:21 PM)huntertarantino Wrote: Saw this at AFI Fest with the Coens and the cast and crew introducing.

Man, do not buy into any praise on this movie. It's awful. Like, I thought Hail, Caesar! was their Ghosts of Mars moment where they were just doing a greatest hits movie, but this... this is terrible.

The Coen Brothers have been near and dear to my heart for 20 years. Lebowski, No Country, Miller's Crossing... few directors have defined me as a person like the Coens. This movie left me equally pissed off and heartbroken. It's the first thing they've done that I've outright hated, a meandering, pointless collection of short stories with no connective tissue. A test of patience. The titular segment is really good, the rest cancels out every ounce of good will.

I can't remember the last time a director I loved let me down like this. Don't click the icon for this on Netflix, even if the reward is forgiveness of all your outstanding debt. It's horrible.

But, you don't like Hail, Ceaser?


Well, then I'm sure it's fine.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
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#51
I'm not going to hate on Hail, Caesar! because I get why it works for some people... but yeah, it definitely didn't work for me.

For me Coens are best when they're focused. The tightness of their aesthetic works best when the narrative isn't rambling all over the place.
the empire never ended
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#52
(11-15-2018, 03:21 PM)huntertarantino Wrote: Don't click the icon for this on Netflix, even if the reward is forgiveness of all your outstanding debt. It's horrible.

No, sorry, it's the first original Coen Brothers Western (!) ever. I HAVE to watch it. Even if it's the worst thing they've ever made, I have to find out that fact for myself.

I enjoyed Hail, Caesar! on first viewing, but its messy, ramshackle nature became extremely evident on the second watch. Hardly a perfect movie, but still has its moments IMO.
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#53
Hail, Caesar! is definitely a "has its moments' movie. The rare (only?) Coens film that actually gets worse upon rewatch.
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#54
Hail, Caesar! is the only Coens movie I've turned off and never finished. (Full disclosure: there's a good number of their movies I haven't seen yet.)
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#55
(11-16-2018, 08:52 AM)Mangy Wrote: Hail, Caesar! is definitely a "has its moments' movie. The rare (only?) Coens film that actually gets worse upon rewatch.

I actually disagree with that.  I liked Hail, Caesar! more once I figured out that it's definitely meant to be lighter than the near decade long span of moody, bleak films.  It might be nothing more than established actors having fun messing around with early 20th century hollywood, but it's very good at it.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
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#56
The lighter moments were my favorite moments, for sure. I just don't think it's many interesting parts came together.
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#57
I am not angry with huntertarantino for disliking this.  I am angry that someone who dislikes this is one of the three people total who are going to get to see it on the big screen.
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#58
Hail, Caesar! is great when it's sticking to the movie-making bits. The whole Communist plotline though just doesn't add up to much for me.
Just this guy, you know?
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#59
Hail, Caesar! also uses one of the most disgusting bits of Classic Hollywood history as a bright and airy plot point. I enjoyed the movie, but once you realize that Johansson's storyline is basically what happened to Loretta Young after she was raped by Clark Gable, it taints it a bit.
home taping is killing music
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#60
(11-16-2018, 12:03 PM)boone daniels Wrote: Hail, Caesar! also uses one of the most disgusting bits of Classic Hollywood history as a bright and airy plot point. I enjoyed the movie, but once you realize that Johansson's storyline is basically what happened to Loretta Young after she was raped by Clark Gable, it taints it a bit.

Debbie Downer.gif
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#61
I like Hail, Caesar!

I just don't like that part of it.

okurr.gif
home taping is killing music
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#62
Boone's totally getting into The Good Place.
the empire never ended
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#63
Oh, no. I'm completely destined for the Bad Place. I know that much about myself.
home taping is killing music
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#64
With all respect to Hunter, he is very, very wrong. It's a mean, cynical and prickly movie that can be hard to love, but I was in awe of it.
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#65
I mean, it does seem like the Coens go through periods where they do work that is widely beloved, followed by work that is more divisive (but may gain a following over time), followed by work that is widely beloved.

The MILLER'S/BARTON two-fer is followed by HUDSUCKER, which is followed by FARGO, which is followed by LEWBOWSKI, which is followed by O BROTHER. Reception of LEBOWSKI and O BROTHER was mixed at the time, in fact, and were part of a run that included MAN WHO WASN'T THERE and INTOLERABLE CRUELTY and THE LADYKILLERS.

Let's not forget that LADYKILLERS gave us this gem of a review from Drew McWeeny:

Quote:Please... Joel and Ethan... stop.

I tried to shake off the feeble slap in the face that was INTOLERABLE CRUELTY. I figured it was a one-time thing. They were recovering from a series of setbacks and decided to make a studio film as a way of warming back up for something great. That’s what I kept telling myself. After all, the thing that has always distinguished them was the way they managed to stand on the edge of the system, making film after film seeming designed to primarily please an audience of two. They made movies that were impossible to categorize. With INTOLERABLE CRUELTY, they seemed to make a creative 180, and for the first time in their career, they made a boring movie. George Clooney grins his way through a hollow farce, trying hard to pump some life into the proceedings, but Catherine Zeta-Jones gave him less than nothing to play off of. It’s not an awful movie. It’s not offensive. But there’s absolutely nothing special about it. In every way, it is just another mid-budget Imagine comedy, no better or worse than HOUSESITTER or FOR LOVE AND MONEY or GREEDY or SGT. BILKO. The real shock, as a longtime Coens fan, was how completely they managed to submerge their personalities. There are only two sequences in the film that feel like the Coen Bros. When Miles (Clooney) goes in to see his boss, everything from the magazines in the waiting room to the way his boss chokes out his message amidst the workings of his various health-related machinery feels like we’re finally in familiar territory. And late in the film, the death of Wheezy Joe is a very funny gag, and well-orchestrated. But that’s it... two sequences in a whole film.

The scary thing is that THE LADYKILLERS makes INTOLERABLE CRUELTY look like RAISING ARIZONA by comparison. The rebound I was hoping for did not materialize. If anything, they’ve moved further in the wrong direction. As much as CRUELTY embodied the spirit of the mediocre Imagine comedy, LADYKILLERS is the perfect realization of just how crappy Touchstone comedies can be, and often are. The visual invention, the eccentric and clever characterizations, the sense that anything might happen at any moment... all the things that make the Coen Bros. who they are... have all vanished without a trace. Even worse, the dazzling cascades of language that have always distinguished their characters have finally dried up, stranding Tom Hanks, who has never looked more desperate to make material work. Hanks is one of our greatest comic actors, gifted with natural timing and unforced charm, and I appreciate the vigor he brings to THE LADYKILLERS. He does everything he can to prop up a script that simply isn’t funny, but I know a drowning man when I see one. Like many modern farces, the film mistakes loud and manic with hilarious, and it ends up playing as dull more than anything, a series of empty moments with no sustained energy. Part of the problem is the casting, which pretty much stinks across the board. Normally, the Coens have a genius for picking just the right person for just the right part and bringing out the best in people. For pissakes, these are the guys who made Tara Reid funny. If that’s not miracle working, I don’t know what is.

How then can one explain the insanely unfunny work of Marlon Wayans or Ryan Hurst, who manages to stop every scene cold just by speaking up? Even the always-reliable JK Simmons comes up dry here as he’s reduced to playing a guy who really, really needs to shit. That’s it. That’s the best this film has to offer. There’s certainly nothing to recommend about the heist that is the film’s centerpiece. It’s so off-hand and limp that it barely deserves to be shown. The “complications” that start piling up are ridiculous, nothing inventive or interesting about them, and the material about the guys trying to kill Irma P. Hall was handled better last year in DUPLEX.
And trust me... DUPLEX fucking stunk.

So let me offer up the hopes I have for the Coens. I refuse to accept that the bored studio hacks who made these last two films are the real Joel and Ethan Coen. I know that these artists still have the ability to summon thunder. I believe it. But they’ve proven now that doing work-for-hire just doesn’t suit them. When they got chewed up by the process on TO THE WHITE SEA, it seems to have taken something out of them. When you read that script, their hearts are on every page. It’s the most difficult thing about working in the studio system. To write a great script, you have to pour all of your faith and belief and energy into that script, but you have to do so knowing full well that you’ve got, at best, a one-in-five chance of seeing that script produced. You may well be creating art for an audience that will never see it. TO THE WHITE SEA has got to haunt the Coens, and in particular, I wonder about what it’s done to Joel. THE LADYKILLERS is the first film where both brothers have shared the director credit. Up till now, Joel has been the director. Is this shift in billing an indicator that Joel is less involved now? At least that would explain the sudden shift in quality as far as how their films look. There is no way the same person was calling the shots visually on THE BIG LEBOWSKI and THE LADYKILLERS.

I hope the Coens begin to follow their muse again. I hope they write original scripts that allow them to return to their own interests. I hope Joel returns to form as one of our most impressive visualists. I hope they stay miles away from studio assignments from now on.

And failing all of that, I hope that before they make another lousy anonymous studio piece of crap, they just stop. I would rather have no Coen Bros. films than have these heartbreaking misfires. Barton Fink wasn’t meant to write Wallace Beery wrestling pictures, and no matter how much of “that Barton Fink feeling” he gives the thing, the studio will never appreciate him properly.

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/17386

And then, three years later, they kicked off a run from NO COUNTRY, A SERIOUS MAN, TRUE GRIT, and INSIDE LLEWYN DAVIS. I'm only leaving out BURN AFTER READING because that one wasn't as critically acclaimed or popular as the others, but it's arguably one of their best.

So maybe they're in one of those periods where their work is a little more divisive, and something like CAESAR or SCRUGGS will gain the esteem in time that BURN and MAN WHO WASN'T have gotten since they came out. Hell, even LADYKILLERS has its defenders.

If the last 20 years are any indication, they'll be near and dear to popular hearts and minds once more pretty soon.
home taping is killing music
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#66
Also, Bill Heck... hello.
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#67
Watching this now. I'm of the opinion that the first five minutes lets you know what to expect from a movie. And if I go buy the first five minutes of The Ballad of Buster Scruggs...


I'd say huntertarantino is a filthy liar.

Granted he said the titular segment was solid, but it's been a while since I've laughed this hard at a Coen's flick.

SO I GUESS WE'LL SEE.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
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#68
Finished the movie and I'm sticking to my initial stance on it: huntertarantino is a filthy, diseased liar.

Also the movie is good.



I get why there are going to be people down on it. Buster Scruggs does EVERYTHING in its power to defy audience expectations of not only westerns but also of their filmography as well. The initial story is obviously meant to ease people into the film as it's the most broad and hilarious of the collection of vignettes. "The Ballad of Buster Scruggs" is the goofiness of "Raising Arizona" Coen Bros, mixed in with a healthy does of nihilism from the "No Country For Old Men" side of the brothers.

"Buster Scruggs-" It'll probably be the most accessible of the stories, for good reason: Tim Blake Nelson as a singing, 1950s "aw shucks" Cowboy who also happens to be disturbingly good at murdering people is fucking hysterical

"Near Algodones." I'm pretty sure that people will wonder what the point of this was. Pretty sure that's also kinda "the point."

Meal Ticket - I know the Coens were working on this movie for 25 years, but they had to have known that by casting Liam Neeson in this, they managed to make this a surprisingly morbid allegory for the man's current career trajectory.

All Gold Canyon - This is a weird one and probably my least favorite of them bunch. I get what it's doing, but I don't think it's effective.

The Gal Who Got Rattled - If ever proof that the Coen's have a mean sense of humor, it's this story. I think this is going to divide people largely because it's easily the longest of the short stories, and plays it straight through most of it. That is well--true to the title's name, the gal certainly gets rattled. It doesn't end well.

The Mortal Remains - Definitely my second favorite story, and a good one to end the movie on.
"God moves in mysterious ways," they said. Maybe he is on your side, the way it all worked out. Remembering other Christmases, wishing for something, something important, something special. And this is it, baby boy Frankie Bono. You're alone now. All alone. The scream is dead. There's no pain. You're home again, back in the cold, black silence
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#69
FYI: Saul Rubinek's Frenchman from "The Mortal Remains" segment is the older version of David Krumholtz's Frenchman from "The Ballad Of Buster Scruggs" segment.
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#70
I loved this, and hunter's disdain for it is surprising.

Funny, dark, beautiful, weird as shit.... Coen-tacular. I think I liked this more than Hail Caesar and Inside Llewyn Davis (which I love outside of the Goodman segment).
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