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Your Community and The COVID-19 Pandemic
#1
Pulling back from the big picture, here's a thread to share what's going on in your local area and with your families.


My community is a suburb on the outskirts of Athens, Ga..

It's only the last week or so that things are starting to be taken seriously. 2 weeks ago real people and cops could be seen eating in restaurants. It was only a few establishments that took the initiative to shut down.

The grocery stores and places like Dollar General are still overcrowded clusterfucks. Only Ingles allows a limited amount of people in at a time. They were the first to do the one direction in the aisles.

There's a Kroger superstore nearby, and everytime I cruise by the parking lot is completely packed. I haven't ventured in there coming up on a month.

All the Churches seem to be shut down.

My extended family is doing the Zoom thing.

We're going to attempt a virtual Communion Easter Sunday.

(My Dad is a retired Methodist pastor).

My cousin is very high risk. She's only 18, but has heart issues. My parents are also high risk - they're 70 +, with various health issues.

I was doing the grocery shopping for elderly shut in Church folk, and helping out my parents when they needed it, but I've been housebound for I guess 2 plus weeks. My Dad shops during a early morning Seniors only period for him and mom once a week.

Sometimes I do cruise around when I get too stir crazy. And hit my package store, now drive-in only. I'm stocked up enough now to ride the month.

A week or so ago I cooked Spam for the first time. I hadn't had it since elementary school. I'm cooking a lot of Cream of Wheat. I've got loaves of bread in my freezer, trying to stretch them out.

That's my boring story. Feel free to vent about your situations.

Peace. Be well.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#2
I'm in the Augusta area and it's been interesting. Postponing The Masters until fall has had a gigantic impact on the community. Many of the locals usually either leave town (and rent out their homes to visitors for $$$) or get a side hustle gig related to the tournament coming to town. That's thrown for a loop now.

One of my kids is home from UGA and now won't be back on campus until the fall (fingers crossed). He would've been staying in Athens at his apartment through the summer, but with his on-campus job cancelled and classes happening remotely staying here with us makes more sense. Of course, we're excited he's safe but it's kinda rough (understatement) paying for an unused apartment for months at a time.

Thankfully, all our family and extended family are doing ok!
"I'm not a smart man" -F. Gump
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#3
I understand about a month ago, when they first shut down UGA, they wouldn't even let the kids back on campus to get their stuff. That's what I heard anyway. I don't know what happened to students with no place to go. (Exchange students, etc.)


I should add, even though there are just 5 reported cases in my county, I always wear gloves.

My aunt in Atlanta is still going to a local diner to pick up take out, but I haven't set foot inside any outside place for a while now.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





Reply
#4
My family and I have been holed up in our home in Brooklyn, NY for now a month. I walk the dog once a day early morning, and I’ve gone to local grocer maybe tree times since being homebound (we mostly get stuff delivered, groceries, etc, and tip the hell out of the delivery folks). I’m still working full time during the week, logged directly into to my office computer in midtown Manhattan. The kids are both on virtual school during the week as well.

It’s getting me stir crazy, for sure. And my 13 yr old daughter, already a bundle of snark and hormones, seems about ready to murder us all in our sleep.

Good god has it been a month already? Time to pour some bourbon!
If you're happy, you're not paying attention.

Originally Posted by JacknifeJohnny: 
Glad that you guys worked that out amongst yourselves.

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#5
I'm in retail so I'm still working as an "essential employee" but it's super stressful. My county has nearly 200 confirmed cases, and I'm sure a lot of that has to do with people not staying the fuck home and shopping at stores like mine. It's infuriating seeing a packed parking lot whenever I pull into work, only to find out the majority of people inside are buying paint. Really fucking essential. We have taken steps to "flatten the curve" by limiting the number of customers to 100 at a time, in one entrance and out one exit. Of course, the paint zombies don't like to follow the rules so a lot of them try to sneak in through the exit, enough so that we had to post security guards there. I just wish they'd close the paint department. I'm so fucking tired of people bringing their herds of children (none of them with masks) to buy one can of paint while complaining they're bored at home and that we should be giving away free hand sanitizer. 

I'm trying my best to be safe. Wear gloves and mask when on the clock and put on hand sanitizer during my breaks. They've given me an extra 80 hours of sick time, but I'm afraid it's going to get worse before it gets better so I don't want to use it too early. I might have to though. These paint zombies are really draining me. Yesterday one of them told me she was "justifying my existence" while I rang her up. I was pissed, but too tired to even say anything.
[Image: local-media712059160668172575.jpg]
"We're not all masters of our souls, Meacham...I learned that on Earth."
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#6
I'm in downtown Berkeley. The county went to shelter-in-place about a month ago now and most of the local businesses are closed. Fortunately I have several grocery options within walking distance.

My job, cinema manager, isn't the sort of thing that can be done remotely and the home office is shut down so nobody's getting paid. Waiting on that first unemployment check. Thankful that my savings are solid enough to get me to the end of the year, but I'm really nervous about the long-term future of moviegoing.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#7
I'm in Vancouver, BC, where, thankfully, the pandemic hasn't racked up massive numbers (yet?). But while the whole province is in isolation I'm still going to my job 5 days a week as a grocery store worker. I joke with my friends that nothing has really changed for me personally except I don't go out after work or on days off anymore.

Work was definitely extremely stressful in the first couple weeks, when it was complete pandemonium. Most of the staff was operating at a high level of paranoia. But things have sort of settled into a new normal and I'm able to sleep through the night without anxiously waking up dreading my return to the chaos.

That said, given that I live alone I do appreciate being able to talk to my work friends in person on the regular. Not sure how I'd fare in complete isolation with my anxiety issues.
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#8
I've been working from home for nearly four weeks; my company "encouraged" working from home just after the middle of March and then on March 23, made it mandatory. My state went into lockdown four days later.

Locally, it's hard to gauge, as my only real trips out have been to the grocery store and a couple of necessary trips to the hardware store. Adherence to social distancing seemed to vary wildly, but my last two trips to the grocery saw a lot of people wearing masks and latex gloves.

I've been out on my bicycle a few times but stayed off the bike/walking path because I saw far too many people (and not a few of them in larger groups) out walking, with no way of keeping at least 6 feet away from them, even if I was pedaling 15 mph.

Probably the most alarming thing was that my neighbors, who have three young kids, up until Monday or so were freely letting their kids play with two other sets of kids from the neighborhood, including the pack of them ranging around the block together. That seems to have stopped but who knows. They seem to be very religious so I'm guessing they've been a hard sell on taking it seriously.
"Nooj's true feelings on any given subject are unknown and unknowable. He is the butterfly flapping its wings in Peking. He is chaos and destruction and you shall never see his true form." - Merriweather

My Steam ID: yizashigreyspear
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#9
Luzerne County in Pennsylvania here, and our infection rates are through the damned roof, once again proving our inferiority to nearby Scranton.

Traffic has notably slowed down, although I've noticed it creeping back up this week.  I'm business critical and can't do my job from home, so I have the run of the building.  I've declared every day as casual day and have also chosen to ignore things like 'no earbuds at work'.

Ironically, weekends are more of a drag now.  Work gives myself a structure of sorts, but my self motivation disappeared years ago, so time off without any planned events equals a lot of YouTube and forum browsing.  I go cycling when I can, as I have my choice of routes around here where I can steer clear of others.

I also think I've been unintentionally plotting a worker's revolution with the warehouse staff, so there's that.
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#10
I'm in Los Angeles and hanging in there.  My company was proactive about helping enable people to work from home so I have been able to do that, thankfully.  I changed jobs/companies in February and the new one seems more prepared for this than the previous one.

Most people here are wearing masks by now and the local and state response has been pretty strong.  It's definitely making me more irritable though for sure.  I typically go out once a day to the convenience store, and try to do the grocery on the weekends.  My therapy counseling place adapted to a video chat format and the weed store is still open and now delivers.  Overall though, there are still people not wearing masks and not respecting social distancing.  It's just a really crowded metropolitan area.  I'm glad that the early prevention efforts seem to be working.
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#11
RI midsize town, still working sporadically at a local grocery store. Don't have to do register or bagging or any intense customer crap, thankfully.

We just got told that a customer who was in the store the other week, on a day I was working, tested positive. So, that's neat. I'm assuming management was alerted as part of contact tracing protocol.

The store didn't start making employees wear masks until a week ago. We lag behind Stop and Shop and Shaws on everything. Didn't put up plexiglass shields for the cashiers until they'd already been doing it for a week, then I'm sure the management gave themselves a big pat on the back. Our massive $2 an hour hazard pay bump also arrived 3 weeks after the rest of the industry. Us being independently owned does not equal independent thought or action, haha.

Over half the customers started wearing masks this week, which is impressive for this uppity uptight suburban enclave (I miss Providence a lot). There are still plenty of quirky holdouts in the middle age and older demographic.

I've seen this one guy come in almost every day, browse for an hour, only get a few things. He freaked the fuck out on me when we didn't have any croissants. He pronounced it in the most labored, over the top way possible. "I'm sorry I didn't hear, can you say that again?" "Kwahsawn! QUAH---SUAHNNN!!!". Bruh, I've been to Paris, they don't fuckin say it like that.

I work with food, so I'm used to obsessively changing gloves and washing my hands between tasks, and not breathing on anything. That part of my work routine hasn't really changed.

I'll just keep hoping for the best, and trying not to inhale when I'm forced to walk near one of these airheads.
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#12
Nashville here... lost my job early in this thing, so we've been staying at the house, looking for work online, sending out resumes and doing what we can while stuck inside. In the meantime, greenways are still open so we've been walking the dogs a lot and grilling (today, I'm smoking some chicken wings!). Most of my neighborhood appears to be at home as well... dogs are being walked from dusk to dawn.
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#13
There is only the dog walk.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
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#14
I almost got a dog before all this hit hard. I wish I had. The loneliness is killing me.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#15
My cat is like "Oh, you have to stay inside all the time?  Cry me a flipping river."
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#16
I should probably be concerned by how comfortable I am with staying in and not seeing anyone.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#17
We got some baby chicks to add to our flock. Its a welcome distraction.
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#18
(04-11-2020, 12:47 PM)hammerhead Wrote: I should probably be concerned by how comfortable I am with staying in and not seeing anyone.
It helps that I'm sharing an apartment with my brother these days, but for about a year some while back I was living by myself and pretty much my only form of socialization outside of work was occasionally going over to visit my other brother and his wife for dinner. Some of us are just wired that way, I think.

Anyway, El Dorado County reporting in here, the Alabama of California. The state as a whole is doing the "actually taking this shit seriously" thing, the county not so much (my employer is adjacent enough to actually essential business that they've declared themselves essential, but the boss just so happened to leave out a notice from the sheriff that don't worry guys, we're not gonna bust anyone's ass over this laying out on a table in the entryway,) but it's been pretty quiet around here nonetheless. We've been doing our grocery shopping in the late hours and pretty much staying in otherwise; going a bit stir-crazy, but otherwise okay.
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#19
(04-11-2020, 12:47 PM)hammerhead Wrote: I should probably be concerned by how comfortable I am with staying in and not seeing anyone.
I was a bit of a shut-in before this, so it's kinda scary how I haven't had to adjust too much.

Meanwhile, the dogs are in heaven...nonstop love and attention all day! They don't know why, but they're thrilled.
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#20
I'm in the suburbs of DC, in Gaithersburg, Maryland. Hearing a lot of buzz that DC is likely to be the next epicenter; Hogan has been saying the DC Metro area is roughly two weeks behind New York, so that's pretty scary. My wife and I have both been able to work from home since the second week of March, so I am extremely lucky and thankful for that. Since its the burbs, I have plenty of big empty streets to jog on, which is helping me shake off stress/anxiety. We are also within walking / hiking distance of lots of wooded trails, and a nature conservation park thing, so we try to be outside when we can.

My wife and I are both homebodies, so this hasn't been a huge adjustment, but we are starting to feel the isolation after 4 weeks. Zoom helps, but its no substitute for the real thing, although ironically my friends and I see each other on Zoom WAY more than we ever did back in real-life.

People here didn't really get serious until April started. Through the end of March, groups of kids are playing outside, clusters of 5-6 (families I assume) are on walks, passing other large groups of people. Sidewalks were completely packed; no masks or anything. Its been better this past week. Grocery stores are now requiring masks, and only letting in a certain number of people at a time. We'll see what happens. Early projection models had us peaking around 5/1.
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#21
Lost my job managing a hotel in Manhattan on March 17th. My wife lost her various freelance outlets at about the same time. I’ve got a number of promises, some in writing, that when the hotel reopens, I’ll be welcomed back, but I’m not sure the hotel will ever reopen. If it does, it’ll be like a month after everything else. No one’s gonna be traveling to NY anytime soon. The government money should make this eminently survivable.

It’s scary being outside, in an epicenter. I’m growing a plague beard. We’re all in apartments on NY, so I guess we’re lucky to have a large one, but I sure do long for a house right about now. Pleased to report that thus far, me and the wife are largely enjoying each other’s company. Dealing with interpersonal issues right now would be tough. And the cats are enjoying the attention.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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#22
Holed up in LA, though going into work once a week, working remote otherwise. Had a virtual Seder w/ family this week via Zoom. It was chaotic but nice.
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#23
One tidbit from Queens, NY. Every night at seven o’clock, the entire neighborhood comes outside and cheers for healthcare workers, whose shift change is at 7pm. It happened every night for the last month and gets louder and longer every night.
Brigadier Cousins on PSN
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#24
Even as a pseudo-hermit, it's been an adjustment.

Food has been the biggest change. I ate lunch out most days, and I'm not even doing take-out now. I actually feel bad about it in one case: a family-owned Mexican restaurant that I've been visiting for 30 YEARS. Half of the current staff are kids of the owners, and I remember eating there when they (and I!) were children.

That might be the only place I eat from before I'm vaccinated. I figure that with a small staff that's almost entirely family, the number of vectors for contagion are an order of magnitude smaller than at a place with random staff from totally separate lives. That is, if they're still open by the time I decide.

Cooking all my meals SUCKS!
Gamertag: Tweakee
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#25
I'm a pretty good cook.

One good thing abut this, I've perfected the omelet.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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#26
I'm used to cooking, so that's no big deal for me. I'm more worried about some of my favorite restaurants around here (the only really good Chinese place in my area, for one.)
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#27
Re: restaurant food, I'm not an expert but zapping it in the microwave for a minute before eating might be a good idea just to be safe.

Found out today that this coronavirus has taken every continent except Antarctica. I know conventional wisdom tells us that hanging out at some remote location in Antarctica might not be the best way to avoid a strange, terrifying, highly aggressive infection that is always looking for a new human host... but perhaps it is time to rethink that?
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#28
My omelets are getting much better as well!
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#29
The croissant guy was back at the store again yesterday. Still no mask, same attitude. Still no croissants.

Our store is capped at 90 people, but that's still too many. People were browsing too close in many aisles, the front line was bunching up, and that was with under 70 people.

We have an employee in her 70s directing customer traffic up front. She'd be making 2-3 times as much money if she was safe at home on unemployment right now.
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#30
I just found out an old friend and lover passed away a couple weeks ago. We hadn't spoken regularly for several years but I ran into her at work last year and she seemed like she was doing really well. She was only 57. Rest in Peace Trish. God this fucking hurts.

PLEASE stay safe, everyone.
[Image: local-media712059160668172575.jpg]
"We're not all masters of our souls, Meacham...I learned that on Earth."
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#31
Oh man, I'm sorry to hear that. Stay safe.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#32
Sorry to read you lost someone close. That’s terrible. I’ll remember you and their loved ones in my prayers.
"I'm not a smart man" -F. Gump
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#33
Sorry for your loss, hp.
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#34
(04-11-2020, 03:35 PM)Dent6084 Wrote: Holed up in LA, though going into work once a week, working remote otherwise. Had a virtual Seder w/ family this week via Zoom. It was chaotic but nice.

The Zoom Seder sounds like it would make a great skit on SNL, or an episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm
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#35
(04-12-2020, 02:37 PM)hifidog Wrote: Sorry to read you lost someone close. That’s terrible. I’ll remember you and their loved ones in my prayers.
Ditto that.
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