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The return of Ambler: New Youtube Channel
#71
Paranoia, bleakness, nihilism, dread... all things we're currently struggling with as a culture was predicted in John Carpenter's 1982 masterpiece, and its the subject of my latest video.  Join me for a deep dive into the madness of the end of the world.

New video every Wednesday at 12 noon central.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#72
Requiem For A Dream is the best anti-drug PSA I've ever seen, and as a film it's full of symbolism and subtext.... my latest video deciphers the various layers of Darren Aronofsky's uncompromising breakthrough.

New video every Wednesday at 12 noon Central.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#73
Ellen Burstyn’s performance still fucks with me.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
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#74
Yeah. She should've won the Oscar. Halle Berry won instead for Monster's Ball, a movie and performance I can barely remember. Which tells you everything you need to know about that movie.

I heard someone put it better than I could... the Oscar goes to the most showy, actory performance, not necessarily the best. Hear fucking hear. The best performances tend to be the ones where it doesn't seem like they're acting.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#75
I still rate Drugstore Cowboy and Trainspotting higher, because they show the attraction of drug use while still not romanticizing it. Requiem doesn't seem interested in why anyone would do this to themselves.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#76
(10-07-2020, 06:08 PM)ambler Wrote: Yeah.  She should've won the Oscar.  Halle Berry won instead for Monster's Ball, a movie and performance I can barely remember.  Which tells you everything you need to know about that movie.

I'm pretty certain it was Julia Roberts that won for ERIN BROCKOVICH that year

That said, despite enjoying Roberts in that movie a bunch, your point stands.  Burstyn deserved it
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#77
Yes. I must've been thinking of supporting actress.

(10-07-2020, 06:16 PM)hammerhead Wrote: Requiem doesn't seem interested in why anyone would do this to themselves.


Slow down there cowboy.  Requiem actually goes out of its way to show why people do it.  Not everyone in the film, but it's clear Sara wants to be on television to impress her son and her friends... so, diet pills.  Harry at one point even shoots up in a cab after crying over his disastrous meeting with his mother.  And he pops off when Marion meets with her therapist to rid his mind of the sex he knows they're having.  Marion hates her appearance (that scene in the mirror) and indulges to make herself feel better.  Tyrone is a little more ambiguous (he doesn't get as much screentime), but at one point he's shown pining after his mother.  Initially the film shows them just taking drugs but after a while the motivations to do so become clear.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#78
I guess what I'm saying is we don't see the seductive side. We see what they're doing it for, but not why they keep doing it.

Or maybe I'm having an empathy problem. It wouldn't be the first time.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#79
Yeah, I think you might need to see a shrink.

Seriously though, I don't like to penalize movies for not doing what other movies do. Not every movie has the same priorities. For me it's more about what it's trying to accomplish, and does it accomplish it? Armageddon doesn't suck more than Deep Impact just because it prioritized action over drama.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#80
JJ Abrams' Star Trek was a hard pill for me to swallow despite being fun and engaging.  I feel like it strayed too far from Trek's original "core values" so to speak.  But the bigger takeaway is Abrams' background and style as a filmmaker, which informed the choices he made for his version of the beloved franchise.  All this and more in my latest video.

New video every Wednesday at 12 Noon Central.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#81
AW YEA MI2!!!
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#82
I think it's instructive that the original ST and SW films were financially responsible productions (with the exception of TMP, which had massive sunk costs, and possibly ESB, which Kurtz allowed to go over budget), unlike the seemingly limitless tentpole funding the revivals received.

Also, I don't see this pointed out elsewhere but the Kid Kirk sequence of Trek 09 is a meta statement of Abrams' attitude towards the fans, in which a classic from 1966 gets run off a cliff and destroyed, just like people said would happen.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#83
(10-14-2020, 01:40 PM)hammerhead Wrote: Also, I don't see this pointed out elsewhere but the Kid Kirk sequence of Trek 09 is a meta statement of Abrams' attitude towards the fans, in which a classic from 1966 gets run off a cliff and destroyed, just like people said would happen.

[Image: st09014.jpg]

(10-14-2020, 01:40 PM)hammerhead Wrote: I think it's instructive that the original ST and SW films were financially responsible productions (with the exception of TMP, which had massive sunk costs, and possibly EMP, which Kurtz allowed to go over budget), unlike the seemingly limitless tentpole funding the revivals received.

from everything I've seen and read, Johnson and Ram Bergman brought LAST JEDI in on-schedule and on-budget

of course, the budget was still insanely huge
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#84
I had high hopes for the first black lead in a Star Wars movie.  Finn's unique backstory was ripe for all kinds of dramatic storytelling opportunities.  Instead, Lucasfilm chose to retread familiar ground with Rey, who felt like a Luke Skywalker repeat... a story that had already been done much better in the previous trilogy.  I was disappointed and in my latest video I examine what went wrong.

New video every Wednesday at 12 noon Central.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#85
I both love how efficient your videos are

but also resent you for these short runtimes! hahaha
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#86
I probably should make them longer, as youtube prioritizes videos over 10 mins. But I also don't like saddling my videos with unnecessary filler... which is a pet peeve I have with alot of breakdown vids.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#87
do not bow to the algorithm!
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#88
I will never forgive Bob Iger for the lack of development of the sizzling Finn/Poe relationship.
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#89
Just a heads up about my Cine-Mechanic channel. From now until the week of November 22nd, videos will be released Thursdays at noon Central instead of Wednesdays. I will be on set for a film shoot, and can't deal with posting stuff until my days off, which is Thursday. The Wednesday schedule will resume the week of the 22nd. Thanks.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#90
In my latest, I revisit Terminator 2 and talk about how it redefined the action genre.  Not only in terms of scale, mayhem, stunts and visual FX, but story and character.  It raised the stakes for every action flick that followed, and to this day it remains THE gold standard on how to craft an exciting, thrilling, suspenseful, and emotionally satisfying cinematic experience.  How James Cameron wasn't at least nominated for an academy award for directing this movie remains a mystery to me.  If Silence Of The Lambs, a horror movie, can win best picture, Terminator 2 deserved to at least be seated at the same table.  I got the same chills from seeing Sara, John and the Terminator escape the mental institution from the T-1000, as I did seeing Hannibal Lecter's escape from the Tennessee courthouse.  It just shows how little respect the action genre gets.  

Anyway, new videos every Thursday at 12 noon Central, until the week of the 22nd.  Then it's back to Wednesdays.  



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#91
Separate to the action, Sarah's scenes in the mental asylum and at the Dyson home were and remain incredible. This film is a masterpiece.
There are weapons in my hands, my hands are weapons.
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#92
Rewatching T2 fairly recently, I was struck by what a good-looking film it is, from shot to shot. Wondering if this was because --or in spite-- of the relatively new Super 35 format, which allows a lot of freedom re-composing in post.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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#93
Dug the dig at Zuckerberg. Also the way you go to bat for Eddie Furlong. Also everything else in the vid.

Thumbs up!
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#94
Nice analysis. I've almost caught up on all of your vids, Ambler. T2 has always been at or near the top of my heap of action films. As for Cameron's use of Super 35 and the balanced look of the film, and without getting too technical, I've read that he attributed that to some of the newer finer grain high speed film emulsions that Kodak (and Fuji) had introduced by that time. Previous to that - and I think you could use an earlier film such as Aliens as an examples (which was not Super 35 ) - you could actually see grain on the exhibited print, especially in lower light situations.
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#95
(10-29-2020, 06:31 PM)Bucho Wrote: Dug the dig at Zuckerberg. Also the way you go to bat for Eddie Furlong. Also everything else in the vid.

Thumbs up!

Thanks... yeah the Zuckberg thing was too easy.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
Reply
#96
Great video. Waiting for the midnight showing of that film was maybe more fun than the film - which itself was sublime. A handful of times in my life I've had very high expectations for a movie and they've been exceeded, and this was sure one of them. Ambler's absolutely right, all of the great fx are in service of a great story and great characters. imo Cameron has never matched it, although he's thrown a few haymakers in the 30 years since.
"Whose advice are you going to take in show business, Judd Apatow or me?" - Norm Macdonald
 


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#97
(10-31-2020, 08:04 PM)subotai Wrote: Great video.  Waiting for the midnight showing of that film was maybe more fun than the film - which itself was sublime.  A handful of times in my life I've had very high expectations for a movie and they've been exceeded, and this was sure one of them.  Ambler's absolutely right, all of the great fx are in service of a great story and great characters.  imo Cameron has never matched it, although he's thrown a few haymakers in the 30 years since.

Thanks sir!
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#98
Out of all the actors to play Batman, Michael Keaton really nailed it in my opinion.  Find out why in my latest video.  



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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#99
That clip of Robin Williams reminds me of the Riddler we could have had...

And wow, seeing clips from B89 and Returns side-by-side doesn't do the first film any favors visually.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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(11-05-2020, 02:11 PM)hammerhead Wrote: And wow, seeing clips from B89 and Returns side-by-side doesn't do the first film any favors visually.

Haha, yeah.  Burton's cinematography vastly improved after the first one... which has kind of a flat, dull lighting scheme with shoddy looking sets at times. The first one had a "backlot" aesthetic to it, but tried to make it seem more real, while the sequel just embraced the unreality of it all and went nuts.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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It's the super-harsh key-lighting that turns me off, especially for a a film that's supposed to look 'nocturnal.' I remember an interview somewhere in which someone talked about the trouble they had putting Batman and Joker in the same frame, since exposing for B meant blowing out J and vice-versa.

Additionally, I recall a later interview with Returns' cinematographer where he says he intentionally lit Catwoman's shiny black costume 'like a car,' using reflections instead of highlights and shadows to define her.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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It's been a while since I posted a Better Than You Remember video.  This time it's one of my favorite supernatural thrillers from the 90s, Flatliners.  Bacon, Sutherland, Baldwin, Roberts, Platt... yeah, 90s thrillers often had insane casts like this.  It's also one of Joel Schumacher's better films.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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My latest essay is short but not to be confused with a lack of enthusiasm about a film that seared into my mind when I saw it as a kid.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Crazy thought as I watch that video: You know what recent movie gave me that surreal otherworldly feeling that Excalibur is infused with?

Mandy.

How weird of a connection is that?

**These videos are excellent. You make your points succinctly, and if you're drawing a conclusion it's one that's either obvious from the movie or you provide specific textual support. I cannot tell you how fucking sick I am of overwritten, overlong, self-indulgent "analysis" scrivened by folks more interested in their own flights of fancy than they are with providing a foundation for their conclusion.

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(11-18-2020, 04:33 PM)ambler Wrote: My latest essay is short but not to be confused with a lack of enthusiasm about a film that seared into my mind when I saw it as a kid.




My favorite film. I approve.

The real ending to Big...
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