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The return of Ambler: New Youtube Channel
The world of 'Her' is my personal dystopia. Clean digital life devoid of flavor or personality.
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The film's color pallette fascinates me in a way that those of, say, Wes Anderson don't.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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Contact is one of those movies I never get tired of watching.  Besides being part of the first wave of DVDs in the format's infancy (and one of the first I bought), it's a fascinating look into the "what if" scenario of contact with an alien species.  And Zemeckis does an amazing job mixing a kind of docu-realism with the needs of dramatic fiction.  Let's take a look at one of the best sci-fi movies ever made.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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We played Contact theatrically, and the main thing I remember is when the majority of the audience chose to take their bathroom break. If you'll recall, Act 2 is a long fakeout where we're supposed to think the mission will proceed without Foster until Busey Jr blows it up. Immediately after the big explosion: bathroom run, resulting in a bunch of folks missing the bit where John Hurt reveals he built a second machine. Now, you'd think the audience would have known that Tom Skerritt was never going to blast off since the poster and the trailers all showed Jodie in a space suit and that was 30 minutes of their lives that could be better spent, but...
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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I love Contact!
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(04-02-2021, 02:05 PM)hammerhead Wrote: We played Contact theatrically, and the main thing I remember is when the majority of the audience chose to take their bathroom break. If you'll recall, Act 2 is a long fakeout where we're supposed to think the mission will proceed without Foster until Busey Jr blows it up. Immediately after the big explosion: bathroom run, resulting in a bunch of folks missing the bit where John Hurt reveals he built a second machine. Now, you'd think the audience would have known that Tom Skerritt was never going to blast off since the poster and the trailers all showed Jodie in a space suit and that was 30 minutes of their lives that could be better spent, but...

LOL.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Realistically, I get it though. The audience doesn't NEED to know how Jodie goes to space, but they DO want to see how Skerritt bites it.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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he bites it by being a hammy chauvinistic prick!
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Contact may only be behind Groundhog Day in ‘favorite filmgoing experiences of the 90s’.

Equal parts conscious and conscience raising pop culture films, the pair of those.
If I could change to liquid, I'd fill the cracks and bend the rocks.
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As for the 'let down' in the ending, I subscribe to the idea that most anything would be a disappointment after that level of build up, especially for this type of film. It can be done, I think the reveal in 'Arrival' works, but that's also relatively front loaded.

It's also a movie I associate with personal tragedy. It was the last movie I saw with my father theatrically. The fact I've been able to return to it over the years speaks to how good it is.
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The original drafts had a bigger ending. Zemeckis didn't like it. I think it reinforces the idea that his ending kind of feels like it belongs in a different movie. CE3K managed to have a lot of buildup and a satisfying conclusion. I'm not saying Contact had to copy that, but the ending does feel very tacked on and "Zemeckis-y" in that he was very schmaltzy in that time period and probably took the personal journey angle too literally. "Oh just put her on a beach with her dad, because it's her story and she misses him and can't connect with people".

Yeah yeah, we get it Bob.
In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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the comedown isn’t helped by the Windows 98 wallpaper setting and the soft filtered composting heheh
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Turns out disaster movies are more than just mindless spectacle and eye candy. They are a window into our psyche as a species. Let's dive into what makes disaster movies so compelling.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Very proud to have hit 1K subscribers on my youtube channel. Many thanks to all who continue to support. Today it's all about the movie that had alot to do with inventing the mullet.  The Lost Boys.  



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Spotting plot holes seemed to emerge from the "gotcha" culture of the internet in the new millennium, and The Dark Knight was one its biggest targets. In this video I go over the phenomenon of the plot hole and whether or not it matters in cinema.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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Eyes Wide Shut is as enigmatic today as it was at the turn of the century. Kubrick's final statement is a cautionary tale about the dangers of infidelity and the dreamlike spells we cast over ourselves when we allow our minds to wander and disconnect from reality.



In 1916 a U.S. court ruling, following the example of company law in Britain, effectively made it illegal for a corporation to be motivated by anything but the maximization of profit.  Corporate social-responsibility, therefore, became illegal. 
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I miss your videos Ambler. I miss their scent. I miss their musk.
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