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1930s Draft: Sign-up & Discussion
There's always Olympia.

A documentary theme would have been difficult but interesting.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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(06-13-2021, 09:29 PM)eviltwin Wrote: That film is both evil and boring.

But it gave use the ending to Star Wars.
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No wonder Chewie didn't get a medal.
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Everyone also hates robots.
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Films that I thought would get drafted:

The Lady Vanishes
Sabotage
Ninotchka
Trouble in Paradise
42nd Street
Top Hat
Mutiny on the Bounty
Gunga Din
White Zombie
Son of Frankenstein
Werewolf of London
Three Little Pigs
Sons of the Desert
Showboat
"Such is the heroic burden. We must always mourn our fallen. Gone Forever! Dead like Robin! Like Supergirl! Deceased like Superman! Hal Jordan! All gone! I weep for them, and know that someday I shall join them. I must go weep. Like a hero." -- Kyle Baker
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(06-16-2021, 08:47 AM)eviltwin Wrote: Films that I thought would get drafted:

Sabotage
42nd Street
Mutiny on the Bounty
Gunga Din
White Zombie
Three Little Pigs

Those were a few I thought would go.  There was a compilation of Disney animated shorts released together that had Three Little Pigs in it that I thought about taking, but it felt like a copout.

Alexander Nevsky was the big foreign film I thought would get picked.
Just this guy, you know?
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I'm disappointed in myself for not finding a slot for Dodsworth.

Also on my also-rans:

A Midsummer Night's Dream
The Baker's Wife
Marius, Fanny, and Cesar (The Marseilles Trilogy)
A Star Is Born
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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I considered White Zombie, it was simply a process of elimination and I went with the Lugosi films from that era I liked more.
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"We're not all masters of our souls, Meacham...I learned that on Earth."
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(06-16-2021, 08:53 AM)Richard Dickson Wrote:
(06-16-2021, 08:47 AM)eviltwin Wrote: Films that I thought would get drafted:

Sabotage
42nd Street
Mutiny on the Bounty
Gunga Din
White Zombie
Three Little Pigs

Those were a few I thought would go.  There was a compilation of Disney animated shorts released together that had Three Little Pigs in it that I thought about taking, but it felt like a copout.

Alexander Nevsky was the big foreign film I thought would get picked.

Yeah, Nevsky is a big one that totally could have been picked. Earth is another notable Soviet film.

Morocco also springs to mind.
"Such is the heroic burden. We must always mourn our fallen. Gone Forever! Dead like Robin! Like Supergirl! Deceased like Superman! Hal Jordan! All gone! I weep for them, and know that someday I shall join them. I must go weep. Like a hero." -- Kyle Baker
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The biggest star of the decade went undrafted - Shirley Temple.

Her fanbase is super weird at this point. Poor, girl. I would've cracked up if someone with a Graham Greene type obsession came out of the closet.

I made this point somewhere else once, but as a final thought, here I go again: as a kid, KING KONG was everything. Loved, LOVED it! Even as a teenager into Gangsters & exploitation, that kinda shit, I was still cool with it. As I neared middle age, it became one I revisted less and less. I wouldn't say I got bored with it, but my sensibilities definitely shifted. Pushing 50, I'm unapolagetically a STAGECOACH kind of guy now.

"Got concrete rhymes, been rappin' for ten years and

Even when I'm braggin', I'm bein' sincere"



"Teenage angst has paid off well/ Now I'm bored and old"


"Drunk as hell, but no throwin' up

Half way home and my pager still blowin' up"


"I'm tired of living all alone
yeah, nobody ever calls me on the phone
But when things start getting bad
I just play my music louder"





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Has anyone heard from Boone lately? He never made a Day 5 pick. I messaged him the other day, but haven't heard back.
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I feel like I let this thing peter out, and for that I'm sorry.

I hope everyone at least had some fun with it, and maybe got a few movie recommendations. In the last week or so, I got around to watching MY MAN GODFREY (first-rate screwball, and with some genuine bite) and THE CHEAT (startling material presented in an economical package, the way pre-Code films managed to do). Anyone else who hasn't seen either of those should do so.
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Let’s still do brackets.
'make sure you pay attention to the awesome suits' - Nooj on UNDERWATER
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Oh, yeah, I'm still up for that if people want.
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I'm all for brackets to talk about these films some more.
"Such is the heroic burden. We must always mourn our fallen. Gone Forever! Dead like Robin! Like Supergirl! Deceased like Superman! Hal Jordan! All gone! I weep for them, and know that someday I shall join them. I must go weep. Like a hero." -- Kyle Baker
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Sorry about my absence. It's been a rough few weeks. I had a really terrible reaction to some new medication.
home taping is killing music
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Feel better!

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"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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Okay - I've made my final selections. I don't think I doubled up with anyone, but if I've made a mistake, let me know.
home taping is killing music
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Did All Quiet on the Western Front really not get drafted? That's an all timer and one of the very, very best movies of the decade. And still a resonant anti-war film.
"Such is the heroic burden. We must always mourn our fallen. Gone Forever! Dead like Robin! Like Supergirl! Deceased like Superman! Hal Jordan! All gone! I weep for them, and know that someday I shall join them. I must go weep. Like a hero." -- Kyle Baker
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That's a steal, all right.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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Brackets are up!


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I thought someone had All Quiet on the Western Front...which is part of why I didn't take it when I was think about it.
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Since I probably won't be long for the brackets, some thoughts on what I drafted. Maybe it will encourage some to seek these out.

1. Gold Diggers of 1933 (1933) - Mervyn LeRoy & Busby Berkeley
Gold Diggers of 1933 is, barring perhaps The Wizard of Oz, the best musical of the decade, IMO. It's a film that cognizant of the troubles of the country, you don't just open a musical during the Depression with "We're in the Money" by accident and "My Forgotten Man" is both socially conscious and a great musical number period. There's a reason Spielberg has referenced this film. The behind the scenes stuff is fun too with a cast that's game for this. I expect most here have seen this.

2. Swing Time (1936) - George Stevens
Astaire and Rogers are one of the most iconic duos ever to grace the screen and this finds them both at the height of their talents. The non-musical parts are fun too, but it really comes alive in the musical numbers. Their sheer grace and energy is apparent right away in "Pick Yourself Up" and it rises to that challenge again and again. "The Way You Look Tonight" is also a great and classic song that's stood the test of time. Okay, blackface number is a demerit, but it only marks it of its time.

3. She Done Him Wrong (1933) - Lowell Sherman
Pre-Code Mae West was a sensation and this still holds up very well. Yeah, the story is barely there and a bit creaky, but as an excuse of Mae's double entendres it serves its purpose. Mae's sexual frankness and the fact that she would cast younger, extremely handsome men as her love interests actually seems progressive to today. The fact that her love interest in the film is the impossibly handsome and charming Cary Grant (who could have had a draft theme around him for the decade) is simply prescient. Oh, the film is also full of corruption, gold digging, white slavery, and anything else that would seem to be a hot button at the time is simply icing on the cake. Mae's character may learn a lesson in the end, but she also gets away with knifing a bitch. Now available on Blu Ray too.

4. Twentieth Century (1934) - Howard Hawks
A Howard Hawks screwball comedy with Carole Lombard and a fully committed John Barrymore. Do I have to go on? Carole Lombard is, of course, one of the quintessential starts of the decade. And Barrymore as an increasingly desperate and controlling Broadway director trying to win back his star and lover on a train as things get ever more desperate for him, is a tour de force. It's a great performance that's deliberately hammed up. It's a comedy triumph throughout.

5. Footlight Parade (1933) - Lloyd Bacon & Busby Berkeley
James Cagney fought for this part and then forever shattered his tough guy image, or at least that tough guys were all he could do, with his fast talking musical theater director with terrible judgement of women. Especially with Joan Blondell sitting right there and matching him witticism for witticism, energy for energy. This captures the fast talking energy of Warner Bros. and the cinematic fireworks of a Busby Berkeley musical very well, albeit I wish the musical numbers weren't so backloaded. Also, lots and lots of gams on display. Very Pre-Code. "Shanghai Lil" is the standout number and Cagney knocks it out of the park.

Bonus 1. Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde (1931) - Rouben Mamoulian
The forgotten horror classic of 1931. Right up there with Frankenstein and might be even more modern and shocking in some ways as it takes full advantage of its Pre-Code freedom. There's an opening point of view one take that's incredibly impressive. And the story, where Jekyll turns to Hyde out of particularly sexual motivations is fully realized. Fredric March turns in an astounding performance too, which rightfully won him an Oscar. And the transformation scene is incredibly well done.
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Bonus 2. Mystery of the Was Museum (1933) - Michael Curtiz
This two-strip technicolor classic is a companion piece to Curtiz's Doctor X and the stronger overall film of the pairing. Curtiz is one of the key directors of the decade and while this isn't his finest work, it certainly puts him on the road to his later triumphs. And it's no coincidence that this film has been remade several times since. Probably Lionel Atwill's finest horror outing of the decade too.
"Such is the heroic burden. We must always mourn our fallen. Gone Forever! Dead like Robin! Like Supergirl! Deceased like Superman! Hal Jordan! All gone! I weep for them, and know that someday I shall join them. I must go weep. Like a hero." -- Kyle Baker
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Still need tie-breakers for Mangy vs. HP and Atom vs. me.
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HS be bustin' ties.

Sorry I phased out there for a few weeks. Brutal schedule at work and at home.

I wanted to write up some thoughts on each of my picks, but I can't seem to find the time right now.

I am discovering some gems here, and will be consulting for future viewing.
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Guess I asked for it.

On to Round Two!
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A thousand pardons, Pither. Thanks for running the show.
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(07-07-2021, 11:57 PM)Hot Sandwich Wrote: A thousand pardons, Pither.  Thanks for running the show.

It's all good!

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Final round is up!
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One could do a hell of a lot worse than to watch (or re-watch) every one of those films.
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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I watched THE MOST DANGEROUS GAME last night. The depiction of the count's "trophy room' is a lot more grisly than I would have expected.
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Ratty is officially the winner. Congratulations, Ratty!

[Image: 2_highlight_writer_hans_kraly_presenter_..._mille.jpg]

Thanks to everyone for joining in, and especially to Judas for maintaining the chosen thread.
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Congrats, Ratty!
"I'd rather wake up in the middle of nowhere than in any city on Earth."--Steve McQueen
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Oh, wow!  Just saw this!  What a stroke of luck getting a bunch of the small subset of 30s films that I've actually seen!
"Lets pour some sugar on Dallas!!  Seriose inquarys only!"
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